12 Things You Need to Know Before Choosing Your Bug Out Location

Rich M.
By Rich M. November 8, 2019 08:21

12 Things You Need to Know Before Choosing Your Bug Out Location

Bug out plans are part and parcel of good prepping. While bugging in is the more popular option, for a number of reasons, there is always the risk of being caught in a situation where your home becomes untenable. When that happens, you’ve got to have a Plan B: your bug out plan.

Sadly, very few preppers have a complete bug out plan. Oh, they’ll have something; some sort of general plan about what they are going to do. But in most cases, they’re missing the most important ingredient; a bug out location.

Without someplace definitive to go to, all they have is an escape plan, not a complete bug out plan. The bug out location is the single most important part of that plan, while also being the single hardest part of the plan to come up with.

Part of what makes it hard to come up with a bug out location is cost. Few of us have the extra cash sitting around to buy the cabin in the woods we’d really like to have. Since we can’t afford that, we tend to run out of other ideas to do. But that doesn’t cut out the need for a bug out location. We just need to be a bit more creative.

12 Things You Need to Know Before Choosing Your Bug Out Location

Even so, before looking for a bug out location, there are some key things we need to know. Otherwise, we’re not going to come close to making a good decision. Basically, these things we need to know fall into two categories; things about us and our bug out and things about the place itself.

There are many potential places that could work as a bug out for each and every one of us, but the right place is going to be something that is going to do the best at meeting our survival needs. That’s something which not all potential locations will do equally well.

THINGS ASSOCIATED WITH US AND OUR BUG OUT BAG

This first list of things will help you know where to look for your bug out location.

What Type of Disasters Are We Likely to Face?

Any discussion about disaster planning, including bugging out, needs to start from the viewpoint of what disasters we are likely to face. That’s the only real way of making sure that we are developing a plan that will meet our needs. At the same time, it can help us to avoid wasting time and energy on things that won’t help us at all.

When we’re talking about TEOTWAWKI events, like an EMP, it doesn’t matter how far we go, the problem will still exist. On the other hand, when we’re talking about natural disasters, the problem will be of a local, regional nature. In those cases, we want to be sure to get far enough away, so as to be out of the danger area.

12 Things You Need to Know Before Choosing Your Bug Out Location

If you live in an area that is prone to hurricanes, then you’ll need to take that into account for your bug out plan. Whatever location you choose, it will have to be far enough inland, so that even if the hurricane reaches that point, it will have lost much of its force. At the same time, it needs to be high enough above sea level to reduce the risk of flooding from storm surge and whatever rainfall the residual storm might dump on the area.

How Far Can We Realistically Travel?

As a general rule of thumb, the farther your bug out location is from your home, the greater the possibility that it will be unaffected by whatever disaster strikes your home. On the other hand, you can only travel so far, especially if you have to resort to bugging out on foot. Balancing those two contradictory realities is difficult.

There are those with money who are buying bug out properties in New Zeeland, which is just about as far away as you can go on this planet. But how are they going to get there? If something like an EMP happens and disables their private jets, those bug out retreats may as well be on the moon. They’d better have a good sailboat, as well as some good sailing skills, if they ever expect to get there.

How Many People Are in Our Survival Team?

12 Things You Need to Know Before Choosing Your Bug Out LocationThe size of your team will affect the location you need. If you’re a lone wolf survivalist (not recommended), you can make your survival retreat in a culvert or an abandoned mine shaft. But you can’t do that, if you’ve got your family with you. There’s even less of a chance if you have several families with you.

Unless you are going to establish a survival retreat that can expand easily to accommodate more people, you’d better have your team put together, before settling on a location. Adding a few new people, to account for couples getting married and babies being born is one thing; adding whole families is another thing entirely.

What Is the Health and Physical Condition of Our Survival Team?

If we’re honest with ourselves, we realize that most of us aren’t in the best of physical condition. That affects our ability to travel, as well as our ability to do hard physical labor when we get to our destination. Any bug out plans must take that into consideration; specifically, how well are we going to be able to travel on foot and how well are we going to be able to build a shelter, once we get there.

Finding the perfect survival retreat location, but not being able to get there, because it requires climbing up a cliff face, isn’t going to help anyone. Nor is finding a location which is too far our team to get to, because we’re all in bad shape. We’ve got to be realistic in our expectations of ourselves.

Related: Emergency Shelters When You Are On The Move

How Much Equipment and Supplies Are We Going to Store There?

Any survival retreat is going to need equipment and supplies. Unfortunately, most don’t come with good storage. If you’re planning on bugging out to the wild somewhere, you’re probably not going to find a secure building there, which you can use to build a stockpile. You’ll either need to build something or install a shipping container. Either way, you would have to own the property or risk losing it all.

The other option is having storage somewhere close by, which isn’t actually at your bug out location. If you’re going to bug out to a wilderness location or an abandoned building you know, which is close to a small town somewhere, perhaps there is storage available that you can rent in that town. If that’s the case, then you will be able to have your stockpile close by, even if it isn’t right at your intended destination.

12 Things You Need to Know Before Choosing Your Bug Out LocationOf course, this means having some way of moving the equipment and supplies you have in your storage cache to the survival retreat; preferably something that doesn’t require a running vehicle.

A large two-wheeled cart or wagon, which can be kept with the supply cache will work for this.

THINGS ASSOCIATED WITH THE BUG-OUT LOCATION

Once you’ve found the right area, this will help you pinpoint your actual survival retreat.

What Is the Potential Population Density in a Post-Disaster Scenario?

Ideally, you want to be someplace with a low population density. The more people there are, the more any potential resources have to be spread around to meet everybody’s needs. Small towns are better than big cities and out in the wild can be even better than small towns. But there’s a tradeoff here; less population means that your team has to do everything for themselves. There’s nobody to barter with food goods and services.

There are two different populations we need to think about here; the fixed population in the area and those who will try and go there in the event of a disaster. In any life-changing disaster, big cities are likely to empty out, as people go in search of the resources they need to survive. These people will most likely head to the smaller communities that are nearby, under the illusion that those communities will have an abundance of supplies.

This will cause the population of many communities to rise exponentially, making them into potential death traps for anyone who ventures there. You want to avoid them, just as much as you do the cities themselves.

Related: Urbanites Moving To Rural Paradise Ruining It For The Locals

What Is the Weather in the Area Like?

Weather will play a much bigger role in a post-apocalyptic world than it does for us today. We Americans are very good at shutting ourselves off from the weather, with our modern air-conditioned and heated homes. But that won’t be available to us if the electric grid is down.

So we want to make sure we take weather into consideration for any plan we make. Will we be able to survive the seasonal weather changes that exist where we are planning on bugging out?

Are There Good, Reliable Water Sources?

12 Things You Need to Know Before Choosing Your Bug Out LocationWater is one of the most critical survival priorities and one which we need to have constantly replenished. We don’t usually think of that, because we’re used to just turning on the tap and finding that there’s water. But that probably won’t exist in a post-disaster world.

Here’s the other part of the problem though. Our nation’s waterways are filled with dams, used to generate electric power and create reservoirs which are used as water supplies. From our perspective, we need to be sure that we aren’t putting ourselves in a position where we are dependent on water sources that are likely to be shut off at the dam, upstream of us.

This isn’t much of an issue if there is enough rainfall to keep those reservoirs filled. In that case, the overflow from the reservoir will keep us in water, even if the gates to the dam are closed. But if there is a time of drought, we may find that we don’t have any water at all, as nothing is flowing out of the reservoir.

Whatever water sources you have available at your survival location, check them regularly to make sure that they are still reliable. You may lose them at some time and need to think about changing your plans to another bug out location.

How Accessible Is the Area to Us? To Others?

This point ties in directly to the one above about the physical condition of our survival team. We need to make sure that any survival retreat we select is something that we can get to.

12 Things You Need to Know Before Choosing Your Bug Out Location

At the same time, it would be great if that location would be difficult for others to approach. Perhaps the direction you arrive from gives you good access, while other directions don’t. Perhaps there’s a hidden way to get there.

Difficult access for others can greatly reduce the risk of needing to defend your retreat. People looking for help won’t go out of their way to find the hardest place to go to. Even those who intend to steal what you have will look for easier prey, before trying to come after you.

How Much Wild Game Is in the Area?

Chances are that whatever wild game there is, will be killed off in the first few months, as people try to prevent starving to death. There just isn’t enough wild game in the United States today to meet the needs of the size population we have. Other than some parts of the country with low populations, wild game won’t stand much of a chance.

Nevertheless, if you can find an area with abundant wild game, your chances of getting at least some of it are improved. Perhaps you live in a part of the country which is already sparsely populated. That’s to your advantage. If you can bug out to a location which is even more sparsely populated, game will probably be in even more abundance.

Don’t forget fish when you’re looking at the wild game situation. Fish are generally more plentiful, reproduce quickly and are easier to catch.

How Hard Will it Be to Grow Food There?

12 Things You Need to Know Before Choosing Your Bug Out LocationRegardless of the wild game situation at any potential survival retreat, you’re only going to be able to create long-term sustainability for yourself by growing food.

How is the area for that? Is the soil good? Is it easy to dig in? Does it have abundant bio-mass and bugs in it to break down the necessary nutrients? Is there sufficient water available?

Is There Adequate Fuel and Building Material Available?

Finally, unless you are building that cabin in the woods or perhaps transporting a yurt to your survival retreat, you’re going to have to build some sort of shelter and provide heat for it. That means having ample woods to get those materials from.

There are many parts of the country with little tree growth. While there are other ways of building shelters, such as using adobe bricks, the easiest way to build a shelter is usually out of wood. You’ll also need that wood for heating in pretty much any post-disaster scenario you can come up with. Selecting a spot in the woods or next to the woods helps ensure that you’re going to have trees to work with.

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Rich M.
By Rich M. November 8, 2019 08:21
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19 Comments

  1. runna muck November 8, 17:58

    if you plan on bugging out minus city dwellers the risk is not worth it people will be waiting in ambush on roadways except in extreme rural areas it is better to buy and live rural NOW and bloster your defences NEVER let any one tell you you cant stans alone as a family with pungie pits swing traps for example take a shotgun shell ,put a dulled ropfing nail on primer and tape it with waterproof tape,bury in ground with a rock behind it sticking about a 1/4 inch above dirt when some one steps on it it blows their foot off.use youre imagination TALK TO A VIETNAM VET I by myself being a x ranger know I can hold off about 100 people or more mineing and bobby trapping my back side and having a fighting position on the other side.take a pipe bomb put an electronic detonator in it from fireworks supply and you have a claymore ,throw it you have a grenade that’s all im going to say before I get myself arrested.go rural now.my nearest neighbor is a mile away marshal law or any one elese is unlikely to show up here but if thay do

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    Reply to this comment
    • Jabba November 8, 20:29

      Runna muck,
      I have to agree that being in the middle of no-where is nice, BUTTT… You are only one person. Its not the one you see that is the problem, its the one that you don’t see that is the problem. A wolf pack hunts in pack for a reason.
      I am in the same boat as you, I don’t want to be any where near other people when “IT” happens. IMHO the more people, the more of a problem, you are going to have.
      I’m torn. Do I bug out to a place that there are going to be people you trust or bug out to a place where there isn’t any one?

      Reply to this comment
      • The Ohio Prepper November 11, 16:12

        Jabba,

        I’m torn. Do I bug out to a place that there are going to be people you trust or bug out to a place where there isn’t any one?

        I think it depends on what the SHTF event is. We live in our rural bug in location; but, for you perhaps making plans for both options is necessary, choosing what to do if and when the time comes, based on the situation and your resources at the time.

        Reply to this comment
    • IvyMike November 9, 01:17

      You could hold off a hundred angry members of AFSCME by yourself but a trained rifle squad would take you out in about 10 minutes.

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    • Miss Kitty November 10, 03:16

      The only problem with being the solitary defender of your hideout is that you have to sleep sometime. Also use the bathroom. Even if you have supplies and water, if there were enough attackers, they could just lay siege to you, rotating duty until you collapsed from exhaustion and then they just walk in. They would likely think that you had some amazing loot for them with the defenses you describe, and would be that much more determined to get it. Sometimes better isn’t better, and it’s best to look like it’s already been looted and abandoned to the reclaiming forest.

      Reply to this comment
      • Miss Kitty November 10, 03:17

        Remember Masada.

        Reply to this comment
        • left coast chuck November 11, 00:40

          Yes, every castle during the middle ages once a siege started eventually capitulated, even the incredibly immense citadel that was Constantinople, probably the largest fortified city in the history of mankind, eventually fell even though it took centuries for it to happen.

          Moscow, Stalingrad and Leningrad are the only cities that come to mind that didn’t fall to an invader but the casualties on both sides were staggering. It was only poor planning on the part of the Germans, the weather and the ability of the Russian people to endure unimaginable privation that eventually led to the Germans giving up and retreating.

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          • The Ohio Prepper November 11, 16:34

            left coast chuck,

            Yes, every castle during the middle ages once a siege started eventually capitulated, even the incredibly immense citadel that was Constantinople, probably the largest fortified city in the history of mankind, eventually fell even though it took centuries for it to happen.

            As I recall, that incident had help from the inside, since the pope in Rome failed to send reinforcements to the Greek orthodox pope residing in Constantinople, so the invaders were helped by religious infighting.

            Reply to this comment
        • The Ohio Prepper November 11, 16:29

          Miss Kitty,
          Masada?
          You mean where all of the defenders committed suicide as they were about to be overrun?
          There have to be better examples, like Concord & Lexington where a ragtag militia beat back the most powerful army in the known world.

          Reply to this comment
      • The Ohio Prepper November 11, 16:16

        Miss Kitty,
        I agree and the reason why a MAG or other group is the smart way to go; however, one must understand that this takes time for recruiting, vetting, and planning.

        Reply to this comment
  2. left coast chuck November 8, 21:36

    Along the lines of where to bug out to, be careful in selecting a foreign country. You may be welcome now, but in an end of the world situation, your welcome may not be so warm.

    A friend of a friend of mine has his bug out location in Western Canada. That’s great and he is welcome in Canada right now. After some catastrophic event that affects most of the U.S., how likely is it, do you think, that parts of Southern Canada (is there such a thing?) and Northern Mexico will be affected?

    If that is the case, how welcome do you think the Canadians will be to a flood of Yanks coming across their borders uninvited? Even now officially they are far more restrictive about whom they let into their country than we are. How restrictive will they be, whether you own land in Canada or not after an EOTW event?

    Not picking on Canada or Mexico, the same applies, I think, to every other foreign country. Despite what one may gather from “news” sources, we still officially allow far more foreigners into our country every year than any other country on this planet.

    Just some food for thought. I don’t have any answers, just questions.

    Reply to this comment
    • The Ohio Prepper November 12, 00:40

      left coast chuck,

      Along the lines of where to bug out to, be careful in selecting a foreign country. You may be welcome now, but in an end of the world situation, your welcome may not be so warm.

      This is a good point; but, I’ll go you one better, in that one should also avoid certain states both pre and post SHTF.
      Your own PDRK should probably be avoided as should Illinois, and much of the east coast from the Delmarva Peninsula up the coast to New England and perhaps Oregon and Washington.
      Many states like Ohio and on down through KY & TN and beyond might be welcoming now. Allowing one to get established; but, moving there en mass, post SHTF might get you a less than warm welcome, unless you really bring needed resources along with you. An MD showing up in a big RV loaded with equipment and medication, ready to be a mobile hospital would no doubt be treated more kindly than someone expecting to be coddled and taken care of by the local government.
      We see that now in Texas as refugees from the PDRK head there and then try to change the place with the same restrictions they left behind.

      Reply to this comment
  3. Joslyn November 9, 04:36

    I think setting up or buying a place along a national mountainous hiking trail is your best bet. The approach would be inconvenient enough to discourage most of the city runners, the setting is mostly rural, yet close enough to small towns, there is potable water access along most of these trails. There isn’t the ability to plant large areas for food, so that would mean food would have to be stored at the location, enough to last a good while for however large your team. And, yes, the best idea is to get this set up now, and to make decent alliances with neighbors and or small towns near the location. If it gets down to having to go by foot, I think the team should be split into groups of no more than 4, set out a day apart from each other. Large groups attract attention

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  4. someolboy November 9, 19:02

    Isolation and strength in numbers with like minded individuals who have skills, to begin with. Learn basic fighting, farming and hunting skills, if you do not possesses these, or you will not survive. Make plans ahead of time, where to go, where to meet, build up food storage ahead of time. Scout out remote property away from towns and cities 30+ miles, in climates where food can be grown and with year round water supply and the benefit of established livestock, cattle and horses – in the area-. Look for off of the “beaten path”, out of sight, out of mind, not easily accessible, hike in or horseback in. Your group establishes its own law and order, area security, work schedules, food prep, teaching, etc. In a destroyed grid or grid down long term situation, you are on your own, help is not coming. Our nations borders will become flood gates because there will no longer be anyway to enforce them with the breakdown of our government. No tech, no vehicles, no law enforcement, (long term) – if you can reach your property by road, a rural farm for example, someone will eventually find you and either want to take it or demand you join a community for the benefit of everyone else. In this scenario, you can’t help everyone. Avoid areas near state prisons and nuclear power plants! This is just a start and certainly not a complete comprehensive list of things to think about.

    Reply to this comment
    • left coast chuck November 10, 18:37

      The question of floods of immigrants coming into the country after an EOTW situation is not an easy one for a definitive answer. The biggest attractions for immigrants, both legal and illegal are the freedoms guaranteed by out constitution; jobs; and the generous welfare system that exists at least in some states.

      After an EOTW situation, welfare will be a thing of the past unless one equates welfare with a FEMA work camp. I think the lure of a FEMA work camp will quickly fade.

      The second lure is jobs. We will all be self-employed after an EOTW event. Why be self-employed in an area where you have absolutely no support system? For most folks staying with the devil you know is better than seeking out the devil you don’t know.

      The final lure, our constitution and system of government may well cease to exist or exist only in small pockets. The rest of the country, while folks may attempt to continue with the rule which have guided us for a long while, exigent circumstances may make many of them unattainable. The days of three month long criminal trials will certainly come to a grinding halt. We will be back to the one or two day criminal trials. Punishment will be swift and sure. No community will be able to afford a convicted killer room and board for decades or longer while his various appeals on minute details of obscure laws wind their way through various appellate systems. Appellate courts will be a faint mote in our collective memories. Justice will be more like a case from the 19th century in Cal Reports, reports of appeals to the California Supreme Court. It arose out of the county where I reside. The defendant was convicted of stealing a barrel of flour worth more than $200 on Wednesday and sentenced to be hanged. Early on Saturday morning of the same week, the sheriff of this country carried out the sentence. The Cal Supremes didn’t find anything to reverse the judgement or sentence (a little late by the time it got there) but did comment a little adversely on the speed of the carrying out of the sentence. However, they found nothing in the law was violated by the speedy execution. We will see more of that kind of quick carrying out of sentences in an EOTW scenario. So the lure of our creaky justice system and the almost motionless movement of government will not be a motivating factor. Farming in the U.S. will not be a motivating factor either. Most of our present farm land is only due to modern technology. The huge vegetable farms in the Indio and El Centro area of California are there only because of irrigation. With no power the farms will quickly revert to sand dunes and desert scrub.

      The same is true of the great central plains. It was hard scrabble living in the central plains until the railroads and irrigation were available and affordable. Central plains are not really ideal farm land. One may eke out an existence there, but again why trade the devil you know for the devil you don’t. If you are eking out an existence in Mexico on hard scrabble land, why trek a thousand miles to start all over again?

      Certainly plunder and crime from the already formed criminal gangs in Mexico will be a danger to all the border states, but fortunately, in most of the border states, the area along the border is really harsh desert. That geographical barrier requires planning and carrying adequate supplies on any raiding party. If we are left without our motor vehicles, that barrier will become even more formidable. Invading forces historically depend upon either carrying sufficient supplies with them or plundering the lands along the path of their invasion. While towns like El Centro and the other towns within a day or two walking distance of the border will be uninhabitable due to plundering bands, much past that likely will not have that problem. Three days in equals three days back unless the invasion is intended to be permanent but without supply lines, most of those towns are there only because of presently existing reliable supply lines.

      Except for a few areas around water and the coastal area of the PDRK, invading places Lordsburg, NM orTucson, AZ might be a real stretch without motor transport. Bisbee, AZ and El Centro, CA, are close enough to the border that they probably would have significant problems with raids. Other towns with similar distances would probably experience the same set of problems or lack thereof.

      Certainly in an end of the world situation Mexico will descend into the land of turmoil it has traditionally been up until the mid-20th century and now it once again has turned into a land where banditry reigns. I think the criminal gangs in Mexico will turn from drug supply because lack of transport will present immediate problems to just plain pillage and rape but without supply lines and transportation, their range will be more limited.

      Just my analysis of what might happen along our southern border. We might see more Canadians fleeing the harsh winters of Canada, but again, transportation comes into play. Why walk 1,000 miles just to find more of the same or possibly worse conditions? Better to hunker down with what one knows.

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      • Joslyn November 11, 01:05

        Well thought out analysis. I still see especially the Allegany, Adirondeck and Appalachian mountains and foot hills as the places to be. Possibly the Blue Ridge, but they are really too close to nuclear power plants and large metropolitan areas. Those power plants will melt down in any kind of prolonged problem, and fall out will depend on which way the winds blow. Establish your location the higher the elevation the better

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        • The Ohio Prepper November 12, 01:03

          Joslyn,

          Well thought out analysis. I still see especially the Allegany, Adirondeck and Appalachian mountains and foot hills as the places to be.

          As just a point of note. The Alleghenies is not a separate mountain group; but, a portion of the Appalachian range, where I grew up as a kid. That entire range has its advantages, depending of course where you locate; but, could well provide resources for living if you had the proper skills and knowledge to use them.

          Possibly the Blue Ridge, but they are really too close to nuclear power plants and large metropolitan areas. Those power plants will melt down in any kind of prolonged problem, and fall out will depend on which way the winds blow.

          The disposition of the nuclear plants will depend largely on what the event is that caused the problem, and in many cases, they will likely continue to operate. Physical destruction from natural events like the tsunami that hit the Fukushima Daiichi could of course cause real problems.

          Establish your location the higher the elevation the better

          For the eastern mountain ranges I would agree, since they are old enough that their limited height brings most places well within the tree line where you can still be protected from the elements and have more survival resources available.
          The western mountains are still young and tall enough that their heights often offer no protection except the bare rocky crags or a few caves, with few plateaus large enough to grow anything.

          Reply to this comment
  5. The Ohio Prepper November 11, 16:06

    Bug out plans are part and parcel of good prepping. While bugging in is the more popular option, for a number of reasons, there is always the risk of being caught in a situation where your home becomes untenable. When that happens, you’ve got to have a Plan B: your bug out plan.

    Since our location has no real threats except for a house fire that we can mitigate or a tornado, that we cannot, our choice is not only to bug in (shelter in place); but, as the bug out location for a select few in our MAG.
    Our only bug out situation would be a rail or truck crash sending a noxious toxic cloud our way, which means traveling to a neighbor or hotel for a short duration.

    Sadly, very few preppers have a complete bug out plan. Oh, they’ll have something; some sort of general plan about what they are going to do. But in most cases, they’re missing the most important ingredient; a bug out location.

    Our bug out location is close, well stocked, and has had no threat causing bugouts for the 35 years we’ve been here. Our only bug out condition has been mentioned above.

    What Type of Disasters Are We Likely to Face?
    There are no threats here except tornados or a house fire, so not much to plan for.

    When we’re talking about TEOTWAWKI events, like an EMP, it doesn’t matter how far we go, the problem will still exist.

    I think you’re overstating TEOTWAWKI and should remember that the ”AWKI” means “As We Know It” and is more likely a job loss or health problem than an EMP.

    On the other hand, when we’re talking about natural disasters, the problem will be of a local, regional nature. In those cases, we want to be sure to get far enough away, so as to be out of the danger area.

    This is where site selection is important, since other than the rare large tornado outbreaks, if you’re away from flood plains and large tinder dry forests, you get a lot of advantage as we do here.
    We could of course get blizzards or ice storms that bring down power for some amount of time; but, we have equipment, fuel, and consumables to mitigate that also.

    How Far Can We Realistically Travel?
    In our late 60’s that is much smaller, at least on foot than even in our 40’s, so short term, short distance will be in a vehicle and we will otherwise shelter in place.

    How Many People Are in Our Survival Team?
    We have as many as 15-20 who would be welcome here, each with knowledge and skills to make a difference. Others would be turned away.

    What Is the Health and Physical Condition of Our Survival Team?
    It varies and at age 68 not what it used to be, so yet another reason to stay put.

    How Much Equipment and Supplies Are We Going to Store There?
    All of it is already here, with sleeping space for up to 20 or more and food and fuel to sustain us all for months or years.

    A large two-wheeled cart or wagon, which can be kept with the supply cache will work for this.
    We have the same cart in the photo just for moving things around the homestead. It’s 35 years old and still works fine. Wish I could find another kit.

    THINGS ASSOCIATED WITH THE BUG-OUT LOCATION

    Once you’ve found the right area, this will help you pinpoint your actual survival retreat.

    We found it when we moved here 35 years ago as a rental and were lucky enough 2 years later to purchase the place. We still love it.
    We’re rural with a good well, a creek that runs year round, along with water catchment from the buildings and farm ponds in the area. When you stumble upon perfection, you simply count your blessings, settle down and stay put.

    There are two different populations we need to think about here; the fixed population in the area and those who will try and go there in the event of a disaster. In any life-changing disaster, big cities are likely to empty out, as people go in search of the resources they need to survive.

    I think this is more myth than fact, since if you’ve ever been stuck in rush hour traffic in the city, you know that nothing moves, and that’s without the greed and chaos that an SHTF event would cause.

    What Is the Weather in the Area Like?
    It’s hot and cold, wet and dry; but, another reason to bug in, since we’re already used to it and acclimated.

    We Americans are very good at shutting ourselves off from the weather, with our modern air-conditioned and heated homes. But that won’t be available to us if the electric grid is down.

    We can still do that with enough shade, insulation and ways to move air like fans or convection through the house.
    Multiple heating sources and being able to camp out in a few rooms also helps here so you don’t need to heat or cool the whole place, just where the people are.

    Are There Good, Reliable Water Sources?
    Our location has a good well, a creek (with fish), rain catchment and local farm ponds, all at the ready.

    We don’t usually think of that, because we’re used to just turning on the tap and finding that there’s water. But that probably won’t exist in a post-disaster world.

    It will here for quite some time since we are self contained (water and septic) and storing water in elevated tanks, even when filled with buckets, will allow the system to function for most things.

    How Accessible Is the Area to Us? To Others?
    Since we live here full time, access is easy. We have road frontage on one side; but, a creek, pasture and forests on the other sides. The pastures are a bit overgrown and black raspberry and MultiFlora rose provide natural boundaries.
    We also have electronic means to remotely detect intruders on the property and our MAG will come here armed.

    How Much Wild Game Is in the Area?

    Chances are that whatever wild game there is, will be killed off in the first few months, as people try to prevent starving to death. There just isn’t enough wild game in the United States today to meet the needs of the size population we have. Other than some parts of the country with low populations, wild game won’t stand much of a chance.

    I think this is another myth, mostly discussed by non hunters. I’ve been hunting more than 50 years and teaching Hunter Education for 28 years, and there’s a reason it’s called ”hunting” and not ”shopping. Not having to deal with seasons and bag limits will help; but, like the middle of deer season, all of those people stumbling around in the field will have animals running for cover and hiding.
    For those of you who hunt, how many times do you come back home for the day empty handed? That is without the strain of the system of desperate hungry people out and about, making noise and scaring the wildlife.

    Don’t forget fish when you’re looking at the wild game situation. Fish are generally more plentiful, reproduce quickly and are easier to catch.

    I agree and with nets or electric shock equipment not legal during normal times, this could more easily get you much needed protein.

    How Hard Will it Be to Grow Food There?

    Regardless of the wild game situation at any potential survival retreat, you’re only going to be able to create long-term sustainability for yourself by growing food.

    True, and living here full time, with finicky weather, that can still be a challenge in normal times.

    Is There Adequate Fuel and Building Material Available?
    Another reason to shelter in place and build up your stores during good times.

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