50 High Value Items To Stockpile For When SHTF

Rich M.
By Rich M. September 23, 2019 07:44

50 High Value Items To Stockpile For When SHTF

Stockpiling necessary supplies is at the very core of prepping. Most of us start out by trying to build a stockpile of food to see us through an emergency and will probably still be stockpiling food when the SHTF. But stockpiling food isn’t all there is to be ready for a disaster. There are many other things we need and use on a day-to-day basis.

Stockpiling food, without bothering to stockpile these other necessary items might not guarantee our death, but it will sure make our lives more uncomfortable. Too much of that discomfort could lead to death; perhaps not directly, but by permitting weakness and disease to bring us to an end.

There are literally hundreds of things that we could use in a post-disaster world; more than can fit in this list. But the items I’ve listed below are probably the most important things to include in your stockpile, either for your own personal use or to use as barter goods.

Disposable Butane Lighters – Fire is one of the things we use the most in a survival situation. Even though it is not considered one of the top three survival needs, it is useful for all three of them. It’s much easier for people who aren’t skilled at starting fires to start them with a disposable lighter than to try and do it any other way.

Waterproof Matches – The waterproof match is the standard fire starter for use in a survival situation. While many people have switched over to butane lighters, matches are still useful. Be sure to get the strike anywhere kind.

Fire Accelerants – Commonly referred to as “fire starters,” chemical fire accelerants or tinders work to get the fire from your matches or lighter into the larger kindling, so that your fire can keep burning. Make sure you have a good stock, as this is essential with damp wood.

Water Filters Water purification is essential to survival, as water that has microscopic pathogens can spread disease and even kill us.

If you use a filter for purifying water, be sure to have plenty of them.

Firewood – Many preppers are planning on heating their homes and cook with a wood fire in a post-disaster world; but few have enough firewood to do that. It takes four to six cords of firewood to heat a home through the winter.

Salt – Salt is not only essential for survival, it’s nature’s number one food preservative. Yet it can be extremely hard to come by. if you’re going to preserve food in a post-disaster world, you’d a better plan on having plenty of salt on hand.

Canning Jar Lids – I’m assuming you have canning jars; but how many lids do you have? They’re not considered reusable, so you’d better have plenty.

batteries

Batteries – Ok, batteries aren’t really a survival necessity; but we’ve got lots of things we use every day, which are battery operated.

Stocking batteries, especially AA and AAA sizes, will make your life in a post-disaster world much better.

Toilet Paper – If you want to see something that people will kill for in a post-disaster world, I think this is it… especially women. Do you have any idea how much TP your family goes through?

Personal Hygiene Supplies – While we’re talking about TP, we don’t want to forget things like soap, toothpaste, and shampoo. Cleanliness in a post-disaster world is important as a means to help combat the spread of disease.

Plastic Bags – Nobody is going to be making plastic, let alone plastic bags in a post-disaster world. Yet they are something we use all the time. If you are planning on using a bucket toilet, you’re going to need a lot of bags just for that. But you’re going to need them for a lot of other things too.

Ammunition – This is probably one you’ve already thought of, but it’s so important, it bears mentioning. Make sure you’ve got enough for all the calibers you use, as well as the most common calibers out there.

Related: Ammo Storage Tips Every Prepper Should Know

Alcohol – Probably the best barter item there is.

Tobacco –The second-best barter item there is.

Antibiotics – If you want to keep your family healthy, I’d recommend putting in a good stock of the most common antibiotics. You can buy these over the counter in Mexico, without a prescription. Make sure you print out information on dosages and to tell you which antibiotics are the best to use in different situations.

Over the Counter Medicines – Self-diagnosis and treatment is dangerous; but sometimes it’s all we have available to us. Having a good assortment of over the counter medicines will make it possible to treat at least the symptoms of common ailments.

Prescription Medicines – If you have family members that need maintenance doses of prescription medicines for chronic conditions, you need to have a stock of those on hand for them. If you can’t get that stock, then look for natural alternatives which will keep them going.

DIY Dollar Store First Aid Kit 8First-aid Supplies – If you ever want to see an environment ripe for injuries, just look at any place that has been hit by a disaster. You and your family will be doing things you normally wouldn’t do, many of which can lead to serious injuries. Be prepared for more than scraped knees and cut fingers; be prepared for treating major injuries.

Related: DIY Dollar Store First Aid Kit

Seed – If the situation continues, you’re going to have to start producing your own food. That means growing a vegetable garden, amongst other things. Have lots of seed on hand, so that you can plant a big garden.

Gardening Chemicals and Fertilizer – There are a number of common chemicals used for gardening, as well as common fertilizers. You’ll need all of that if you’re hoping to get a bountiful harvest.

Fishing Gear – Fishing is probably the easiest way of harvesting food from nature. There’s just one problem with it, I have yet to meet a fisherman who doesn’t lose hooks, lures and other gear on a regular basis. So that means you’d better have plenty, so that you can keep on fishing, even after losing your favorites.

Fuel – Ok, this one is a bit tricky, as gasoline doesn’t store easily. It tends to lose its potency pretty quickly. But then, even less potent gasoline is better than no gasoline. And there are additives you can get, which will help that gasoline to last longer.

Repair Parts – If you’ve got gear that you are going to use to survive, you had better have some way of repairing it. That includes parts for just about anything you are planning on using as part of your survival. For example: If you’ve got some of those old Coleman lamps, which can burn gasoline, you should have rebuilt kits for the air pump.

1. Tools How to make a Native American Bow And A Bone Arrow

Hand Tools – We are so used to using power tools for just about everything, that many people don’t have hand tools anymore. Do you have a crosscut saw? How about a hand-crank drill? You’re going to need them, if you can’t connect your power tools.

Honing Stones – To keep knives and other sharp tools sharp.

Rope – Always useful. We tend to stock paracord, which is excellent; but you might want some heavier rope as well.

Sewing Supplies – There probably won’t be any shortage of clothing lying around in a post-disaster world, but there will be of sewing supplies. You’re going to need to be able to fix clothing, as well as taking it in as you lose weight.

Sturdy Shoes – Good shoes are important, and by good I mean something that is rugged and will hold up, giving your ankles support. Most of the shoes we wear today won’t do that; they’re more decorative than anything else.

Rugged Clothing – Rugged jeans, flannel shirts and other work clothing are going to be useful as well. The stuff you wear to the office just isn’t going to make it when you’re chopping wood.

Work Gloves – This is one thing you don’t want to try sewing yourself. Nor do you want cheap work gloves to try and do hard work in. Get several pair for each member of the family, especially those who do the hard physical work of survival.

Vitamins – Your diet probably won’t be well-balanced in a post-disaster world. It will be mostly carbohydrates and fats, with a little bit of protein thrown in. The micronutrients that nutritionists tell us we need will be notoriously absent. Good vitamins can help overcome this problem, helping you to remain healthy.

Reading Glasses – Even if you don’t wear glasses now, that doesn’t mean you never will. Keeping a variety of reading glasses around, in different magnifications, may help you to be able to do things as you age, that you wouldn’t otherwise be able to do.

Antibacterial Hand Cleaner – This is a good one to help prevent the spread of disease. Clean hands aren’t going to contaminate food or contaminate other people.

Spices – One of the best ways of getting the most out of the food that you do have available to you is to change its flavor. This can be especially good when you have children, who can be notoriously difficult when it comes to unfamiliar foods. Disguising what it is and making it taste similar to something they like is one of your best ways of dealing with this.

Bullion (also known as soup stock) – Anything can be turned into a soup or a casserole, if you have soup stock to go with it. Generally speaking, having beef and chicken flavors is enough, as they go with everything else.

Flashlights – There’s no such thing as enough flashlights. They don’t last forever and you really can’t fix them.

Leather and Leather Stitching Supplies – Our ancestors used leather for a wide variety of things, like making shoes and harnesses. We’ll need it for making a variety of repairs, like resoling shoes.

Lime – This is one of those things that people forget about. Lime is used in outhouses to help keep the odors down, as well as reducing the population of insects.

Wicking – If you’re going to make candles, you’re going to need wicks for them. While just about any cotton string can be used for that, a cotton string isn’t all that common anymore. A few yards of wicking doesn’t cost all that much and it will allow you to make your own candles.

I Lived In A Post-SHTF World For 3 Years And This Is What I LearnedCandles – Speaking of that wicking, it would be a good idea to have a bunch of candles, already made, on hand.

I prefer making mine in spaghetti sauce jars and using multiple wicks.

That produces more light, so I can work by candlelight if necessary.

Oil-burning Lamps – A good oil-burning lamp will work off of just about any flammable liquid, providing you with light. The best is oil, of any sort; but if you have something else, they’ll burn that too. Just try it outside first, to make sure it’s not going to blow up the lamp.

Insect Repellant – Nobody likes becoming the mosquito’s dinner. Yet there are more of them in the world than there are of us. Good idea to be ready to deal with them and keep them off your body.

Pest Control – Speaking of dealing with insects, it’s a good idea to be able to kill them too, as well as trapping mice and other pests. Don’t skimp, as you won’t be able to run back to the local store for more.

Cleaning Supplies – Yeah, who thinks about stockpiling cleaning supplies? But if you want to keep the cockroaches and ants out of your home, you’re going to want to have the necessary cleaning supplies to keep your home clean. This is important for fighting disease as well.

Aluminum Foil – We talk about using aluminum foil for cooking in a survival situation and most people include it in their survival kit. But how many of us have extra aluminum foil back home, to use for cooking food in the wake of a disaster?

Activated-Charcoal Natural Remedy For Radiation

Charcoal or Propane – Whatever fuel your barbecue grille runs on, be sure to have plenty on hand.

That grille is going to be your first alternate stove.

You may move to a fire pit later; but in the first month of surviving in the post-disaster world, that grille is it.

Related: Medicinal Uses for Activated Charcoal

Cast-iron Pots – Okay, this really isn’t a supply; it’s more like gear. But if you’re going to cook on your barbecue grille, it would be a good idea to have cast-iron cookware on hand. That grille is going to be a bit rough on your Teflon cookware.

Wind-up Mechanical Clock – Maybe you won’t care about what time it is in a post-disaster world and maybe you will. Either way, it might be a good idea to have a clock that you can count on running when there aren’t any batteries to run it.

Chlorine Bleach – Not only is bleach good for cleaning, it’s the easiest means of purifying water. Just add 8 drops of standard (non-scented, non-color safe) bleach to a gallon of water, stir it and allow it to sit for 20 minutes. That will kill all the microscopic pathogens, making it safe to drink.

Hard Candy – Everyone likes something sweet; but unless you’re keeping bees, that’s going to be pretty scarce in a post-disaster world. Hard candies will keep for a long time, can be eaten slowly, extending the enjoyment and can also be used to soothe a sore throat.

So, there you have it; my “top 50” list. However, much you think you need, try to stockpile more; lots more. If you don’t use it yourself, you can use it as barter goods, getting things that you need.

You may also like:

10 Awesome Food Ideas for Your Bug Out Bag

How To Make A Year-Round Self-Sustaining Garden (Video)

Homemade Substitutes for Toilet Paper

5 Ways to Make Survival Candles From Household Items

How To Recharge Alkaline Batteries

Please Spread The Word - Share This Post
Facebooktwitterredditpinterestmail
Rich M.
By Rich M. September 23, 2019 07:44
Write a comment

76 Comments

  1. Wannabe September 23, 14:39

    Charcoal is good to have put a pain in the butt to store. Fire wood is great for an open pit fire and the same wood can be used to cook with on the grill. Small pieces of oak, hickory, pecan, mesquite, depending on the area you live in will determine the wood you use. Study now which are great and get some. As with anything else keep it rotated so you have a fresh supply. And in the mean time learn how to slow cook meat with that wonderful wood. You will be glad you did. Fish, deer, beef, pork, chicken are all great to cook for three five or eight hours or more if it is a big piece of brisquette. Bon appetit.

    Reply to this comment
    • left coast chuck September 23, 17:04

      Wannabe: Store charcoal just like you store any other consumable, in 5 gallon buckets with a screw on lid. If you don’t want to invest in 5 gallon buckets, put the bag the charcoal come in into a yard trash bag and leal it shut with a hot iron.

      Or you can store the charcoal in a 33 gallon trash barrel with a tight fitting lid. You can usually fit about about 60 #s of charcoal in a 33 gallon trash barrel. The tight fitting lid will keep it dry in your yard.

      When cooking, you really don’t need to have the huge charcoal bed that you are accustomed to having. Experiment and see how few charcoal briquettes you actually need to cook. Keeping the cover on the kettle will retain heat and make the cooking go faster.

      Reply to this comment
      • The Ohio Prepper September 24, 00:14

        left coast chuck & Wannabe,
        If you can find ”real” charcoal or make your own you’ll be way ahead.
        Those bags of Briquettes from vendors like Kingsford are a mixture of charcoal powder & clay (limestone powder, corn starch, etc), formed into those cute little Briquettes and baked. That’s why you get that little pile of ash & clay when they are done.
        Lump charcoal is generally a better fuel with no additives.
        This article will save me a lot of time talking about it.
        Best Charcoal Briquettes – Buying Guide and 7 Top Products for 2019
        https://www.foodfirefriends.com/best-charcoal-briquettes/

        Reply to this comment
  2. Chuck September 23, 15:17

    If you can afford it. Get a nano silver colloidal generator. With antibiotics being less and less effective, nano silver is hard to beat for viruses, bad bacteria, fungus, and most parasites.Jim Humbles’ book to make MSM is priceless.

    4
    2
    Reply to this comment
  3. Janeth September 23, 16:35

    For personal hygiene, keeping a stockpile of feminine items such as tampons and sanitary pads will be a must. Just be sure to dispose of them safely so they aren’t dug up by animals or provide a breeding ground for pathogens. They will also be a bartering items and can also be used for their original intent as wound dressings.

    Reply to this comment
  4. Get Prepared September 23, 16:47

    Add a manual means to draw well water to the hand tools list. An Emergency Well Tube (emergencywelltube.com) allows you to maintain access to your well water and can be used without having to remove the components from the inside well casing.

    4
    1
    Reply to this comment
  5. Rastus McGee September 23, 18:47

    Butane stoves are nice too.. but many don’t know that Butane will not work in cold weather. It doesn’t come out also if you have butane lighters they won’t work. Learned camping the hard way ! No coffee that morn!

    Reply to this comment
  6. plaza7 September 23, 19:10

    Build or have parts for a a small Rocket stove.

    Reply to this comment
  7. SBM September 23, 19:24

    The author makes the same mistake that most preppers make by suggesting the you purify water with chlorine bleach.
    Chlorine bleach can be deadly if mixed with other chemicals such as ammonia. This article from the CDC gives some good advice on the use of chlorine bleach.
    A much better way to purify your water is with Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2.) You need to use 35% food grade which can be obtained from almost any health food store and it will have a 100% kill rate on bacteria in your water which give your water a very long shelf life. Where as chlorine will not completely kill the bacteria and that is what makes it necessary to change your water storage from time to time. The good thing about H2O2 is that the 35% food grade will last for years if kept in a cool storage condition and will be an essential emergency item. It can be used for medical, food, and when mixed in drinking water (8 drops to 8oz of water) it will promote a better, healthy body.

    Reply to this comment
  8. Torn September 23, 20:15

    Recently heard about powdered Penicillin, anybody know where to get it and so on and so forth.

    Reply to this comment
    • ed September 23, 23:17

      You can buy Tetracycline in powder form, never heard of penicillin in powder form. I can buy it in pint size bottles liquid form at the local farm store. Best bet for antibiotics are fish version…..amoxicillin is very close to penicillin and available cheap for use on fish.

      Reply to this comment
    • The Ohio Prepper September 24, 00:21

      Orn,
      Powdered Penicillin or amoxicillin, is what’s in the 500 mg gel capsules, so you could take one apart if you had a real need for the powder.
      You can order many non-narcotic medications here: https://www.alldaychemist.com/

      Reply to this comment
  9. IvyMike September 24, 02:15

    Boiling is the best way to purify water, chlorine is #2. Lots of different opinions on H2O2, I would feel less sure of the results using it, and don’t want a learning experience that could cost me life or health. There is a not well thought out minor campaign against using bleach in the home, maybe Gwyneth Paltrow is behind it considering her ideas on steam cleaning, which works well with greasy engines.
    Build a good sized rocket stove and boil a kettle of water with a few sticks is my plan.
    I tried colloidal silver years ago, learned all about it, can say close to 100% it is useless, but it’s one of those things people get religious about.
    Fish antibiotics, good and cheap, but antibiotic use without lab tests is a crap shoot, maybe the one you’re using will help, maybe not. Life after SHTF will be hard.
    I use most of the stuff on the list of stuff to stockpile, but haven’t stockpiled most of it. All the lists everybody is always making, a man should just open up Sam Drucker’s General Store and be sure to rotate the stock.

    Reply to this comment
    • Govtgirl September 24, 07:51

      I like this. Water purity is scary, just shudder at what people do in tv survival challenges. Question, how long do you boil it?

      Reply to this comment
      • The Ohio Prepper September 24, 11:59

        Govtgirl,
        For water of unknown quality you should bring it to a open rolling boil for at least 1 minute, except at altitudes of 6000 feet or higher, at which point boil it for at least 3 minutes.
        The open to the air rolling boil first boils off any VOC’s and then the 1-3 minutes kills any pathogens. In general, boiling longer is better.

        Reply to this comment
        • Govtgirl September 24, 16:45

          Thank you. My grandfather used to hum his way through “The Skater’s Waltz” to time eggs. So, sounds like after the rolling boil starts, three “Skater’s Waltz”es should do it.

          Reply to this comment
      • Steph September 24, 14:36

        Get a distiller. Good for extracting oils, good for making your own alcochol, and good for distilling water to remove all the crap. I personally like the mini sawyer water filters good for 10000 gallons. They also have a community water filter by lifestraw…check it out!!!

        Reply to this comment
      • Val September 24, 20:20

        Tattler has reusable canning lids. Will need rings to hold them in place.

        Reply to this comment
      • red September 25, 02:57

        This is a major why we’re encouraged to stock cases of bleach. What is you have no fuel? Bleach lasts for decades, and doesn’t take a lot to purify water. Iodine, barely few drops, can purify a gallon. We need to stock more bleach, and iodine. Iodine is a very necessary micronutrient. If goiter is a factor in your area (most areas with good rainfall will be deficient), then a drop of it (you can buy the clear for this) on the skin each day prevents it.

        Reply to this comment
        • The Ohio Prepper September 25, 18:03

          Red,

          This is a major why we’re encouraged to stock cases of bleach. What is you have no fuel? Bleach lasts for decades, and doesn’t take a lot to purify water.

          Actually bleach does not last for decades and will degrade significantly within 6 month, becoming about 20% less effective each year after that.

          Iodine, barely few drops, can purify a gallon.

          The best source for iodine or chlorine for water purification I’ve found is ”Potable Aqua”. It comes in a small brown bottle containing tablets used to purify individual servings.
          Calcium or sodium hypochlorite (pool shock) is the best way to keep chemistry for making bleach on hand, being careful however, since it can react with other things if it gets wet in its container.

          Iodine is a very necessary micronutrient. If goiter is a factor in your area (most areas with good rainfall will be deficient)

          You can purchase potassium iodide, often used in nuclear preparedness kits or just keep iodized salt or kelp tablets on hand.
          The amount of iodine required is miniscule, so any of these will easily cover the bodies requirements.

          Reply to this comment
          • red September 26, 22:24

            Already stocked. I never heard of bleach, if stored right, degrading. We mark everything, and had a jug over 5 years old that was still good. Powdered bleach (like pool shock) can be bought at farm stores, if there are dairies in the area. Again, we never had a problem keeping bleach.

            Reply to this comment
            • The Ohio Prepper September 28, 13:06

              Red,

              Already stocked. I never heard of bleach, if stored right, degrading. We mark everything, and had a jug over 5 years old that was still good.

              What does good mean and how did you test it?
              If you take some water containing bacteria, count them with a microscope, add the appropriate amount of bleach, and perform the count an hour later, you can see the effectiveness of the solution on bacterial contamination. You may also use a chlorine test kit like those used for swimming pools if you know the appropriate level.
              For disinfection the EPA recommends a 6% hypochlorite level.
              Clorox tells us that bleach properly stored is good for up to 1 year, unopened and that heat or extreme cold are the main problems with breakdown of the solution.
              For this reason, bleach manufactured and purchased midsummer, contains more hypochlorite solution, to ensure it remains strong enough when purchased after sitting in a warehouse and on the store shelves.

              Reply to this comment
              • red September 30, 01:14

                The bleach clarified cloudy water. It removed stains from clothing. There was no discernible difference between it and a fresh jug. It’s difficult to get a high bacteria count here. We have copper in the water, which kills bacteria. Bleach is stored in the house, where the temps do not run to the extreme. The caps are tightened before it goes into storage, each case is marked as to the date. AKA, I’m over 60 and have been around the block a few times 🙂 No need to preach to the choir. Research is what I do for a living. If biologists tell me to trust it, knowing how I store it et al, then I will.

                Reply to this comment
          • red September 27, 02:44

            Forgot to add, medical personnel in the family are stocked on Russian iodine (brown io). It’s cheap, it works, and don’t cause a lot of pain. Other prefered is clear in the small bottles. We’re discussing wounds, not nuclear attack. As we have several mountain ranges between us and the closest military installation (Mothan AFB), and prevailing winds cut away from us, I’m more concerned with medical. You require the Potassium Io where you are. Folks in the Tucson and Phoenix areas will, as well. If the bombs are big enough, we can expect earthquakes across the state. Medical is vital. niio

            Reply to this comment
            • The Ohio Prepper September 28, 13:21

              Red,

              We’re discussing wounds, not nuclear attack.

              That does make a difference.

              You require the Potassium Io where you are. Folks in the Tucson and Phoenix areas will, as well. If the bombs are big enough, we can expect earthquakes across the state. Medical is vital. niio

              Actually for us, iodized salt and kelp tablets give us a more than adequate supply of iodine, since only 150 mcg (0.00015 gm) are required per day.
              We also get needed iodine in foods like Dairy, Shrimp, Tuna, Eggs (mostly in the yolk), Prunes (dehydrated plums) (13 mcg per), and Lima Beans

              Reply to this comment
              • red September 30, 00:54

                Post-SHFT, where will you get kelp from in Ohio? Since the accident at Fukushima, how do you know anything from the sea is safe? Iodized salt? How many pounds do you stock to last of several years? In case of a nuclear exchange, how soon will it be safe to eat all these foods? Weeks? Months? In a few years? Prunes are great, I love them, but to keep them longer, outside a freezer for more than a few months you risk worms in them. Ditto any dried food. Like anything else, they have to have special storage, and part of that is to keep them from absorbing moisture from the air. How many pounds would you need to make it over several years? What is a nuclear blast sterilized the hens? Iodine, because even with all the fail-safes retirees from USAMRID are using, they know better than to simply think they’re safe just because. Live for the future, we need you. niio

                Reply to this comment
                • The Ohio Prepper September 30, 05:19

                  Red,

                  Post-SHFT, where will you get kelp from in Ohio? Since the accident at Fukushima, how do you know anything from the sea is safe? Iodized salt? How many pounds do you stock to last of several years?

                  I’ll get the kelp from the jars of tablets in our stores. I hadn’t thought of contamination of new product from Fukushima Daiichi, so perhaps we’ll have to measure for radiation before consumption of any new product. I have the equipment and expertise to do so. One tablet per day exceeds the daily requirement, assuming you get nothing from your other foods or supplements.

                  Iodized salt in the U.S. is standardized @ 45 mcg (micrograms) of iodine per gram of salt. The recommended daily intake for adults is 150 micrograms that can be obtained from ½ to ¾ teaspoon of table salt. Since a pound of table salt contains about 26.6 tablespoons meaning a pound of salt will provide something between 35 & 53 full daily supplement doses, so on the low end, 10 pounds of iodized salt will last an adult for a full year.

                  In case of a nuclear exchange, how soon will it be safe to eat all these foods? Weeks? Months? In a few years? Prunes are great, I love them, but to keep them longer, outside a freezer for more than a few months you risk worms in them.

                  Then it seems I need to freeze dry and Mylar some with O2 absorbers, or I could just do the same with plums.

                  Ditto any dried food. Like anything else, they have to have special storage, and part of that is to keep them from absorbing moisture from the air.

                  I keep lots of Mylar bags, O2 absorbers and desiccant packages around for just this reason.

                  How many pounds would you need to make it over several years? What is a nuclear blast sterilized the hens? Iodine, because even with all the fail-safes retirees from USAMRID are using, they know better than to simply think they’re safe just because. Live for the future, we need you. Niio

                  Folks @ USAMRID, NORAD, the Greenbrier and other places are probably in worse shape than you & I, since they are counting on others for everything, and if it breaks, all they can do is scream about it.
                  I think everyone here is looking to the future or we wouldn’t bother.

                  Reply to this comment
                  • red September 30, 15:30

                    Radiation from Fukashima spread around the Pacific. Something like 27 volcanoes on the Rim and under the sea are perking, spewing radioactive material. China uses the Pacific as a chemical dump. Japan did, all the Rim nations did, and it’s still there. Kelp is organic, and kelp degrades.

                    How long will your stores be open after SHFT? 3 days, if there are no riots. When 9/11 hit, the nation shut down for 3 days. When SHFT hits, it might be months and even several years before we get back on line. If bomb and the volcanoes put enough dirt in the atmosphere, forget summer for years. Krakatoa stopped summer for two years, yet there are volcanoes far worse ready to blow, many overdue. Nuclear bombs could start a chain reaction. Then what? No kelp, no chicken feed, no garden. In wetter areas than here, iodine supplements are needed. But, depending on anything from outside can and often does lead to a disaster.

                    Salt is perishable, meaning in a high-humidity area like yours, it can melt. As well, you live in a fault zone. The antifault, the Mississippi damaged parts of Ohio the last time it woke up. All those limestone caves that had been weakened collapsed or are ready to. Remember Pickletown? The hill is a lake, today. Liquid iodine can dry out, but the mineral is still good, but it’s very water soluble. When salt sweats, it still looks good, but where does the iodine go?

                    Freeze drying! Now you’re cooking. We have a full freezer, but here, a solar dryer is the best thing, then plenty of chilis to keep out bugs. No need to waste the mylar here. Glass jars with tight lids work fine. For that matter, they’re found maize in 1,000 year old granaries that was still good. The main watermelon in the patch is called Ancient. The seeds were found in a Southwest grave over 300 years old, and they sprouted. A bro on Preppers sent me tepary beans, the original domesticated North American bean. They do not like a lot of moisture around the roots. Yet, I’m picking dry beans by the handful from a very few plants. Scarlet runners started for the fall garden, something popular here. Large, good eating, very good as dry beans, as well, and they love cold weather. They also make a large tuber in case the vines get frozen, and will sprout when the weather warms up. Volunteer amaranth, a domesticated grain type, came up all over with the rains. But, from April on, wild amaranth grew well despite little rain (measured in centimeters) and is now setting seed. How much of your gardens is wild plants?

                    You have military installations and nuclear plants in Ohio, and more in the rest of the Midwest. How vulnerable are they to attack? And then there are all those fault lines running under the Plateau.

                    Two cousins, retired now, bought into a community in the Appalachian mountains west of District of Criminals, deep in a rural area. Consider USAMRID to be well-cared-for and able to continue work in a number of locations. NORAD knows it’s vulnerabilities and when you hear people like these screaming anything, look closer. Remember how Trump works. He’s waving one hand to get the attention of the sheeples, while the other hand is doing something completely different, and gets the job done, to the shock of sheeples, always.

                    Neolibs opened the nation to a flood of possible terrorists. Yet, for how many decades have those shipping containers been coming in? They aren’t just carrying human-feces raised veggies and heroin, but humans. The dems stopped us from using CO2 gas to kill foreign insects because it was killing their new constituents, as well. How many are terrorists from Asia? We stopped them in Cebu, but the gangs broke up. China has a booming Muslim population, yet does little to stop them. Just the usual controls. All men have to be trained in the military there. N. Korea grabs ankle for China. Most nations in Asia will. Most of the world will, and right now S. Africa is being squeezed by China. Where I am, I’m far safer than Ohio is. Enough so, family in Ohio is talking Arizona. Family on the East Coast are moving deeper into the mountains and away from the interstate system.

                    Reply to this comment
      • Lonnie Hopson October 3, 14:50

        3 to 5 minutes should be okay.

        Reply to this comment
  10. Dave September 24, 04:00

    Canning Jar Lids may or may not be reusable but wax, (bees or just candle) is. When I was growing up my mother did a LOT of canning. Lids were not always available so she just sealed the jars with wax. This kept and sealed better that lids and kept just as long and the wax can be melted and used over and over again.

    Reply to this comment
    • The Ohio Prepper September 24, 12:10

      Dave,

      Canning Jar Lids may or may not be reusable

      If you are careful when you remove them, don’t bend the lid, and nothing peels off, they may often be reheated in boiling water and used again. YMMV

      wax, (bees or just candle) is. When I was growing up my mother did a LOT of canning. Lids were not always available so she just sealed the jars with wax. This kept and sealed better that lids and kept just as long and the wax can be melted and used over and over again.

      We did the same; but, this only safely works for high acid products like jams, jellies, and fruits.
      You should also avoid candle wax, since all too often candles contain additives & scents, that should not be ingested. Plain old block paraffin that may also be used to make candles is cheap, more versatile, and safer to use.

      Reply to this comment
      • ed September 24, 17:51

        It’s not the acid, it’s the sugar that is the preservative in jams/jellies. Wax won’t work on anything that requires pressure canning…..which are most foods without high sugar content, or high acid, like SOME (but not all) tomatoes.

        Reply to this comment
        • The Ohio Prepper September 25, 00:21

          Ed,

          It’s not the acid, it’s the sugar that is the preservative in jams/jellies. Wax won’t work on anything that requires pressure canning…..which are most foods without high sugar content, or high acid, like SOME (but not all) tomatoes.

          Actually the sugar (or salt) can act as a preservative; but, simply adding sugar to low acid foods does not mean you can safely water bath can them or use wax to seal them. High sugar content may keep them from spoiling; but, other bad things can happen with improperly preserved low acid foods.
          Low acid foods that are not pressure canned may allow the Clostridium Botulinum bacteria to develop, releasing their waste toxin that causes botulism.

          The only way to safely can any foods is high enough acidity, pH < 4.6 to inhibit the growth of the Clostridium Botulinum and keep it from excreting it’s toxin, or pressure canning to raise the temperature high enough (240° for 10 minutes) to kill the spore based bacteria.

          This is basic organic and food chemistry.

          Reply to this comment
          • red September 26, 22:19

            Definitely. Mom always waterbath canned jams and jellies because by spring, anything with just a wax coating would begin to ferment. No matter how much sugar or acid in the fruit, it would ferment. Uncle Dimy used to go around to folks who only used the wax and cooked it all in a copper kettle, then refermented it in new oak barrels. Mix with rye and he had rockin’ rye. niio

            Reply to this comment
    • red September 26, 22:27

      Have you tried reusable rings? They’re supposed to last 27+ times. We use a lot of bail jars, and the rings are reusable, with caution. An aunt would reuse jar lids but only for high acid like tomatoes. She still lost some each year, and kept plenty of rosemary on hand, in case something went wrong. That works against food poisoning. niio

      Reply to this comment
      • The Ohio Prepper September 28, 14:04

        Red,

        Have you tried reusable rings? They’re supposed to last 27+ times.

        We have always reused rings. You remove them from the jar after it seals, clean and dry them and they are good to go until they either break or get rusty.
        Did you mean reusable lids like the ”Tattler?”

        We use a lot of bail jars, and the rings are reusable, with caution.

        We only use wire bale jars for storing dry goods and with caution those rings / gaskets can be reused if undamaged. For canning liquids, they were great back in the day; but, I would not use them today, unless I had no other choices.

        Reply to this comment
        • red September 30, 01:23

          Tattler and for bail jar rings. Bail jars are durable, and last for generations. We’re using ones my grandmother gave to my mother 50 years ago. the rubber rings last for years if cared for (wash and store in an airtight plastic bag). No worries about BHP or other chemicals poisoning food as with canning lids. Lids used more than once can leak chemicals into the food, which is why they’re only guaranteed for one use. When I use Tattlers, I only use them with plastic lids from mayo jars. But, bail jars? Very rarely is there a problem if you know how to use them.

          Reply to this comment
  11. red September 24, 04:28

    Rich, Good advise, except for the lighters. butane decays, as I found out the hard way, losing a good lighter to bad gas. Even after cleaned out and refilled with good gas, it never worked right. As butane decays, it smothers flames. It’s still dangerous, tho. niio

    Reply to this comment
    • The Ohio Prepper September 24, 12:20

      Red,

      Good advise, except for the lighters. butane decays, as I found out the hard way, losing a good lighter to bad gas. Even after cleaned out and refilled with good gas, it never worked right. As butane decays, it smothers flames. It’s still dangerous, tho. niio

      It’s not the butane that decays; but, the plastic of the lighter.
      I have numerous butane lighters that are years old and still working, when stored properly; but, my best butane flame source are small butane torches and the canned butane for filling / refilling them
      My latest acquisitions in this are the TurboBlue Multi Purpose Butane Torch Stick purchased on clearance (50% off) at Rural King. They have the Piezo igniter instead of the “flint” that is actually a small ferrocerium rod, so with no consumables other than the butane, should provide a long service life.

      Reply to this comment
      • red September 25, 03:32

        Cross my heart and swear to God, TOP, the butane’s can was not made of plastic. It wrecked two lighters, mine and my son’s, and when we tested it, would not burn. A quick check on-line to a number of cigar- and pipe sites all said basically the same, butane decays with age. If there is no other gas, shake the can well (10 seconds), but expect the lighter to die faster, and not last as long. Honest to gosh, I’m over 50 and might know a thing or two, given that’s my profession, researcher.

        I use jet lighters with electric spark, and a small bright flashlight on the other end. The things are so cheap they don’t even have a name, but work fine is cleaned on occasion. .99c + tax. and they’ll last 6 months to a year before the gear that makes the spark wears out. The flashlight can work for up to another year.

        Reply to this comment
        • The Ohio Prepper September 28, 14:20

          Red,
          That’s an interesting lighter; but, I use BIC and BIC minis and have no such problems. Butane and propane are stable as liquids unless heated to high temperatures
          I have canisters of both that are years old and still work fine. Are you sure your cheap light / lighter didn’t degrade or allow air to leak into the butane, that would be a problem.

          Reply to this comment
        • Lonnie G Hopson October 3, 14:58

          the can of butane I am currently using is over 10 years old…notice I said still using. I also have used propane cans on my lanterns and camp stoves that have been in the shed for years. They have never let me down. BUT, I still prefer my trusty old Zippos…I have some that were my Grandad’s and Dad’s. I keep plenty of flints, fluid, and replacement wicks. They never fail!

          Reply to this comment
          • red October 4, 00:25

            And I’ve bought butane off the shelf and it was bad. 🙂 There are superior grades recommended by pipe-and-cigar sites. That can last quite a long time, but it’s still organic.

            Zippo is the best, but I can’t hack the fluid. Allergies, bad news. Aside from that, when it hits summer, they gent to dry out fast. And, the small can attract unwanted company in the wrong scenario. niio

            Reply to this comment
          • The Ohio Prepper October 4, 04:09

            Lonnie,

            the can of butane I am currently using is over 10 years old…notice I said still using.

            I also have butane canisters that old, that still work fine. They are all the Ronson brand and are used for filling lighters and torches.

            I also have used propane cans on my lanterns and camp stoves that have been in the shed for years. They have never let me down.

            I have numerous propane canisters (14-16 oz) that we also refill from a 20# tank. Our primary fuel is propane and we have capacity to store 3200 gallons on hand in our interconnected tanks (e.g. tank farm).
            When properly stored, propane lasts indefinitely.

            I still prefer my trusty old Zippos…I have some that were my Grandad’s and Dad’s. I keep plenty of flints, fluid, and replacement wicks. They never fail!

            I have a few old Zippos in the mix; but, my current favorites are the BIC mini’s and the USB chargeable plasma lighters.

            Reply to this comment
            • red October 6, 00:42

              Yeah, Ronson, that was the brand I picked up that was already bad. I complained and got my money back. The teller put it right back on the shelf.

              Reply to this comment
              • The Ohio Prepper October 7, 20:06

                Red,
                I have cans of Ronson 5 or more years old that are still in good shape.
                In fact, I’ve not seen any other brand of butane for refills.

                Reply to this comment
                • red October 8, 19:49

                  That’s fine. Ronson is the one brand I no longer trust because it’s the cheapest and decays. Do your research. Zippo makes the highest quality, Ronson has a lot of impurities. Except for the yellow can, it’s considered very low quality.

                  Reply to this comment
                  • The Ohio Prepper October 9, 00:55

                    Red,

                    That’s fine. Ronson is the one brand I no longer trust because it’s the cheapest and decays.

                    I don’t know that it’s the cheapest and not sure how it or any butane would decay, unless kept in harsh storage conditions. Not unlike the propane I use it is a stable fuel if kept in a sealed container that’s kept cool & dry.
                    I have 4 containers of Ronson I’ve been using in lighters and torches for years with no problems.

                    Do your research. Zippo makes the highest quality, Ronson has a lot of impurities. Except for the yellow can, it’s considered very low quality.

                    I’ve done my research.
                    What kind of impurities?

                    Can you list them or is this just conjecture because you had problems?

                    In general only natural gas has impurities; but, when trace gases like butane, propane. And others are extracted; they tend to be relatively pure.
                    I once worked on a system to look for and quantify those impurities in real time.

                    According to this article: The Best Butane Refill 2019, Ronson fairs as well as many others.
                    https://windycitycigars.com/blog-cigar/butane-refill/

                    Reply to this comment
                    • red October 9, 04:53

                      Sigh. Now you accuse me of conjecture. I told you several times, I do research. It’s my profession. You have a can, one can of gas you’ve never had trouble with it then appear to base all the same brand on that one. Butane is a hydrocarbon. It can decay, or impurities can get in. Ronson is not known for a quality product.
                      In your article, Ronson is pretty far down on the list.
                      https://www.friendsofhabanos.com/forum/topic/105080-is-all-butane-created-equal/
                      Why it smells bad
                      https://www.rollitup.org/t/ronson-shatter.730420/
                      low quality
                      http://www.brothersofbriar.com/t17467-butane-lighter-issues
                      Possible line clog after using ronson
                      https://www.puff.com/forums/vb/cigar-accessory-discussion/171800-what-am-i-doing-wrong-butane-lighter-issues.html
                      2nd reason, low grade butane
                      https://www.neptunecigar.com/tips/lighter-troubleshooting
                      If you need more, I’m in.

                    • The Ohio Prepper October 9, 12:36

                      Red,

                      Now you accuse me of conjecture. I told you several times, I do research. It’s my profession.

                      I did research and Development for a more than 40 year career, and if your assertions are more than conjecture or opinion, then cite your sources.

                      You have a can, one can of gas you’ve never had trouble with it then appear to base all the same brand on that one.

                      Actually I have one brand (Ronson) I’ve never had trouble with, using more cans than I have counted, over a 40+ year time frame. I started using it because it was readily available at many local outlets from Wal-Mart to Tractor Supply and have simply never personally had any issues running it in numerous devices.
                      If you read my linked article you will see that they also rated it well among others with no warning to avoid any brand.

                      Butane is a hydrocarbon. It can decay, or impurities can get in.

                      Impurities can be left in during the extraction or bottling process and it can decay via bacterial or ultraviolet light exposure; but, both are highly unlikely in the metal can.

                      Ronson is not known for a quality product.

                      Can you cite credible sources for this assertion?

                      In your article, Ronson is pretty far down on the list.

                      I’ll give you that; but, I’m not sure of the point since they didn’t warn anyone away from it.

                      Why it smells bad

                      From your article:
                      You can do the mirror test and spray some tane on a mirror, and see what type of residue it leaves and how much. I’ve done this with many brands and find that Lucienne, Power, or Colibri to be some of the cleanest butane brands compared to brands such as Zippo, Vector, GasOne, Ronson, Blazer, and Newport.
                      This indicates that Zippo is also not the best one; but, we use what we can find, afford, and works well for our needs.
                      I’m also not sure what the ”shatter” is that is mentioned in the 1st article, since it appears to be something inhaled being the issue, and my butane is never purposely inhaled or used to light anything that is purposely inhaled.
                      Note that Zippo also left residue.
                      Personally I’ve never noticed any odor; but, I’m normally using it only briefly in a lighter to seal paracord, to ignite a tinder bundle when starting a fire, or in one of my torches when soldering or brazing.

                      2nd reason, low grade butane

                      From the article:

                      If you are having problems with your lighter, if may be due to one of several reasons we list below. Please read carefully. We find that most problems with lighters are due to incorrect bleeding and can be fixed easily.

                      I’ve never had these kinds of problems with inexpensive BIC mini lighters nor my cheap or expensive torches.

                      Premium butane is required to ensure optimum performance of your lighter. Lighters require the cleanest butane available at a pressure of 45 psi. Recommended premium butane brands (Colibri, Nibo, Prometheus, any triple refined butane) are packaged in 10-13 oz. cans with a metal fill tip nozzle. Non-premium butane (Clipper, Ronson, Sun) and brands with plastic fill tip nozzles are not recommended as they may cause inconsistent ignition and performance. If you have used a non-premium butane to fill the lighter, bleed the tank and refill.

                      This did give me some good information and I will attempt to find better butane with the metal tips when my current supply begins to run low.

  12. Black Swan September 24, 11:30

    Instead of kerosene lanterns and oil lamps, I’d go with solar lanterns because of safety concerns. Oil lamps not only can start a fire if knocked over, but when they’re unlit they are releasing chemicals into the air that can be unhealthy, especially in a winter survival situation where we don’t want to be opening windows and letting heat out unnecessarily. Also, the oil for them will eventually run out or degrade in storage.

    The only solar lanterns I have currently are some cheapies that I don’t bring inside. Instead, I let them charge up all day tied to fence posts about four feet high, and then leave them there to light the driveway at night. If the SHTF, I’ll start bringing them inside at night instead. They’ve lasted a long time. Not sure how long, because I forget when I bought them.

    It’s true they can’t be relied on to fully recharge on cloudy days, but if I desperately needed light inside at night following a dark day, I’d rather light a candle in a deep jar than deal with anything that has liquid fuel. A candle in a jar can also be knocked over, but if placed away from flammable things, it’s probably not going to set the house, or the BOL, or the forest, on fire!

    Reply to this comment
    • red September 27, 02:02

      You’re right. I didn’t think of that, but we’re solar, anyway. In Arizona, everything is going solar, fast. Lights on highway signs, warning lights on highway equipments, electric fences, pole lights, exterior lighting. Even those candles people put out in paper bags at Christmas. From bug lights to water heaters and well pumps. If you can afford it, get what’s made in Israel. They’ve been going solar for generations. their well pumps are great. Wind is too chancy here, and in the valley, no one uses windmills any more.

      Adding to this, kerosine has a strong odor. It stinks. People know what it smells like and can trace that smell to a house or to a person who uses it. If they attack, the house is toast, and the kerosine becomes a bomb.

      Reply to this comment
  13. The Ohio Prepper September 24, 12:46

    I’m breaking this into pieces since it fails to post as is.
    Already living on a rural homestead helps a lot here.

    Disposable Butane Lighters
    Don’t dispose of these, since all of the ones I have can be refilled and reused.

    Waterproof Matches
    You can purchase these or make your own by dipping in paraffin. Wrapping the match from just below the tip to the other end with cotton butchers cord and then dipping the whole thing in paraffin gives you a waterproof, self lighting candle.

    Fire Accelerants
    Paraffin oil (lamp oil) or paraffin or beeswax works well here, as does Chapstick or petroleum jelly.

    Water Filters Distillation

    For distillation you need to open boil the water first to drive off any VOC’s with a lower vapor pressure than water, to prevent concentrating those potentially toxic substances. For filtration search Amazon for: Gravity Water Filter Kit for DIY Purifier, Includes .2 Micron Ceramic Filter, Pre Filter, Dispenser, and Instructions by SHTFandGO . The cost is around $30.00 plus two food grade buckets and some construction time using a drill.

    Firewood. Many preppers are planning on heating their homes and cook with a wood fire in a post-disaster world; but few have enough firewood to do that. It takes four to six cords of firewood to heat a home through the winter.

    The amount of firewood depends on the size of the home, how well it’s insulated, and how much you’re trying to heat.
    We have a 12 room (4 bedrooms) house; but, in a situation where we would need to use mostly wood heat, we would only heat 3-4 rooms at most and have done this in the past on 2-3 cords of wood.
    You can also make a passable substitute by tightly rolling corrugated cardboard into logs that can be burned for heat.

    Salt – Salt is not only essential for survival, it’s nature’s number one food preservative. Yet it can be extremely hard to come by. if you’re going to preserve food in a post-disaster world, you’d a better plan on having plenty of salt on hand.

    We keep 1000 pounds or more on hand at all times, with most purchased for the water softener; but, it could be ground up and used for other things should the need arise.
    To be continued

    Reply to this comment
    • red October 9, 22:10

      Ohio: This time, you didn’t do the necessary research. Yes, I am accusing you of slacking, albeit tongue in cheek. One on-line store looking to sell gas is not a neutral observer. I have no clue why you feel the need to defend that can of gas, but I do uphold you on it. I’ve had a lot of Ronson that lasted years, but the only bad butane I’ve ever had was from cans of Ronson. All I’m saying is, buy quality because quality is much cheaper in the long run.

      I did cite credible sources. You cited someone selling butane. BIC are the highest quality throw-away lighters on the market. The interior design is, as far as I know, made to take crappy gas. I’ve found BICs in dirt and getting rusted on top, but a little oil and care and they burned fine. BIC is an intelligent choice. I don’t know about their refillables, but would assume they have the same design and standards.

      Reply to this comment
      • The Ohio Prepper October 14, 13:54

        Red,

        This time, you didn’t do the necessary research. Yes, I am accusing you of slacking, albeit tongue in cheek. One on-line store looking to sell gas is not a neutral observer.

        Fair enough. I didn’t find any credible definitive sources around; but, I didn’t look all that hard.

        I have no clue why you feel the need to defend that can of gas, but I do uphold you on it. I’ve had a lot of Ronson that lasted years, but the only bad butane I’ve ever had was from cans of Ronson. All I’m saying is, buy quality because quality is much cheaper in the long run.

        My need to defend was in response to your need to attack or criticize, at the mere mention that I was using that brand.

        I did cite credible sources. You cited someone selling butane.

        Your ” credible sources” were 2 cigar aficionado sites.
        One states:
        “FOH is a community—first and foremost. Our shared passion for Cuban cigars brings us together, but it is the community you’ll find on arrival that keeps this watering hole plentiful, varied, fun, interesting, and vital. Fraternity, friendship, loyalty and laughter are as much macronutrients of life as is oxygen and water. Our forum—the cornerstone of FOH—thrives and grows, day-to-day, year in, year out, on these shared experiences.”

        And the other: “Cigar Reviews, News, Forums, Videos, Interviews and more!”

        So I see no more butane expertise than the site I listed. One did mantion some test for impurities, by spraying on glass and watching for any residue left there upon evaporation; but, they were concerned with inhaling those impurities, and I only use the butane for lighters and torches, so some impurities have no real effect on my uses. I’m not also sure what impurities would be worse than the tar and other nasty things in that tobacco smoke.

        BIC are the highest quality throw-away lighters on the market. The interior design is, as far as I know, made to take crappy gas. I’ve found BICs in dirt and getting rusted on top, but a little oil and care and they burned fine. BIC is an intelligent choice. I don’t know about their refillables, but would assume they have the same design and standards.

        As I understand it, BIC Disposable lighters are disposable and by definition not refillable; however, preppers being natural hackers, there are ways to do so:
        ”How to Refill a BIC Lighter”
        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kQb1NTi0Xg8

        I also have another brand that I use for a single burner butane stove for emergencies: ”Gas One Gasone Butane” that comes in an 8 oz can the directly fits the stove

        Reply to this comment
        • red October 15, 01:26

          I’m afraid its the other way ‘round. I mentioned Ronson as junk gas, you jumped on me for it. When I proved it, you cut me off.

          Yep, they have experience, not someone trying to see a can of gas. That’s research. There are sites with plenty of science behind them, if you want.

          Got this, and thanks for posting it. I like Bic, and stated why. They’re the Zippo of disposables 🙂
          ”How to Refill a BIC Lighter”
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kQb1NTi0Xg8

          Reply to this comment
  14. The Ohio Prepper September 24, 12:47

    Canning Jar Lids
    We keep several sleeves of these on hand, purchased in bulk when on sale. Worst case, our heirs have to fine them a new home.

    Batteries

    Stocking ”rechargeable” batteries, especially AA and AAA sizes, will make your life in a post-disaster world much better.

    We have some alkaline and lithium purchased in bulk when on sale; but, most of what we use are the Panasonic Eneloop along with multiple ways to charge them including stand alone solar.

    Toilet Paper – If you want to see something that people will kill for in a post-disaster world, I think this is it… especially women. Do you have any idea how much TP your family goes through?

    We keep close track of the TP and never have less than 200-250 rolls in storage. There are potential replacements; but, none are pretty. LOL

    Personal Hygiene Supplies – While we’re talking about TP, we don’t want to forget things like soap, toothpaste, and shampoo. Cleanliness in a post-disaster world is important as a means to help combat the spread of disease.

    Plain old soap will work for the body, the hair, and even shaving.
    A mixture of baking soda & salt can be used for toothpaste.
    To be continued

    Reply to this comment
    • Ed September 24, 17:55

      We do a fair amount of canning, so we have in stock right now about 200 dozen regular size lids and 500 dozen wide mouth.

      I keep 12-16 cords of firewood cut/split/stacked in the dry at all times.

      Reply to this comment
  15. Illini Warrior September 24, 12:47

    bleach is already degrading sitting on the store shelves – high %%% pool shock (calcium hypochlorite) is the way to go – decades of storage …

    in regard to fishing supplies – think time & labor management – one of the food gathering chores better left to autonomy – plenty of hooks for jug & trout lines – auto-fisher reels – gill nets – and even a electro-shock transformer …

    Reply to this comment
    • The Ohio Prepper October 4, 04:17

      Illini Warrior,
      in regard to fishing supplies – think time & labor management – one of the food gathering chores better left to autonomy – plenty of hooks for jug & trout lines – auto-fisher reels – gill nets – and even a electro-shock transformer
      Now that’s my kind of fishing, along with traps. LOL

      Reply to this comment
  16. The Ohio Prepper September 24, 12:48

    Plastic Bags – Nobody is going to be making plastic, let alone plastic bags in a post-disaster world. Yet they are something we use all the time. If you are planning on using a bucket toilet, you’re going to need a lot of bags just for that. But you’re going to need them for a lot of other things too.

    We purchase the Zip Top bags by the case and keep the plastic shopping bags for other uses. No need for a bucket toilet since we have a good septic system; but, having pieces around for such a thing is probably a good idea.

    Alcohol – Probably the best barter item there is.
    We have several gallons of 151 and 190 proof PGA as well as some 86 proof dark rum. All for medicinal purposes of course. LOL.
    Actually the PGA may be used to make tinctures that can be useful.

    Antibiotics. If you want to keep your family healthy, I’d recommend putting in a good stock of the most common antibiotics. You can buy these over the counter in Mexico, without a prescription. Make sure you print out information on dosages and to tell you which antibiotics are the best to use in different situations.

    For those not close to Mexico you can order non-narcotic medications from https://www.alldaychemist.com/

    Prescription Medicines – If you have family members that need maintenance doses of prescription medicines for chronic conditions, you need to have a stock of those on hand for them. If you can’t get that stock, then look for natural alternatives which will keep them going.

    For non-narcotic medications look at the link above or simply ask your doctor for additional refills of scripts you use. I talked to 2 of my docs and mentioned disaster planning like the hurricanes, and how they could impact our area even if not directly, and they wrote the scripts I needed. Beyond what is ”normal” your insurance may not pay for them so this might have to be out of pocket.
    To be continued.

    Reply to this comment
  17. The Ohio Prepper September 24, 12:50

    Seed
    We save seeds and purchase them on sale @ end of season. Sometimes we’ll get packets that were originally between $1-2 for as little as 15-20 cents. Older seeds may not germinate @ 100%; but, 5 packets @ 30-40% will still feed you for less than $1.00 in cost.

    Gardening Chemicals and Fertilizer – There are a number of common chemicals used for gardening, as well as common fertilizers. You’ll need all of that if you’re hoping to get a bountiful harvest.

    I’ll mention 3 items here: Compost, Compost, and Compost, all of which give you most of what your garden needs for fertilizer. If you happen to have chickens as we do, composted manure is a great nitrogen source.

    Fishing Gear
    We have a creek on the property with pan fish, and while traditional gear (hooks & bobbers) are handy, post SHTF fishing could involve nets, traps, and electricity. Just sayin’

    Fuel
    We keep numerous gallons of stabilized gasoline and Coleman fuel; but, our main fuel source is a propane tank farm holding more than 3000 gallons after our recent summer fill. We can use it to heat, heat water, cook, and run the generator.

    Repair Parts, and the materials and tools to make some of them on your own. It’s amazing what one can do with a nibbler, files, and some time on your hands.

    Hand Tools
    I assume you mean ”manual” hand tools, although I have some great Ryobi ONE+ battery powered versions and ways to charge the batteries.

    Honing Stones and other sharpening tools, like steels, ceramics, and files or sharpening tools like: Smith’s 10-Second Knife & Scissors Sharpener JIFF-S or ” Smith’s CCKS 2-Step Knife Sharpener”</strong
    To be continued

    Reply to this comment
  18. The Ohio Prepper September 24, 12:51

    Sewing Supplies
    And an old treadle sewing machine that still works.

    Sturdy Shoes, Rugged Clothing, & Work Gloves
    All of these are standard on a rural homestead, and except for the boots, we have many spares.

    Vitamins – Your diet probably won’t be well-balanced in a post-disaster world. It will be mostly carbohydrates and fats, with a little bit of protein thrown in. The micronutrients that nutritionists tell us we need will be notoriously absent. Good vitamins can help overcome this problem, helping you to remain healthy.

    With proper planning, there is no need for lack of protein.
    Also, sprouted grain can provide nutrition that just the grain may not.

    Reading Glasses
    And other magnification tools, like a lighted magnifying glass.
    I carry one with me at all times.

    Antibacterial Hand Cleaner
    Actually good old soap and water with thorough cleaning generally works as well. Some of those hand cleaners are alcohol based, so you may need a moisturizer to keep from getting chapped skin.

    Bullion (also known as soup stock)
    Boiling cracked bones for the marrow as well as skin and fat can make your own tasty, nutritious soup stock; however, Bullion is still a good inexpensive thing to keep on hand.
    To be continued

    Reply to this comment
  19. The Ohio Prepper September 24, 12:52

    Flashlights – There’s no such thing as enough flashlights. They don’t last forever and you really can’t fix them.
    Good LED lights are now inexpensive; but, make sure you also have batteries for them. We keep 18650’s and NiMH in chargers at all times.

    Leather and Leather Stitching Supplies
    If for nothing more than shoe & boot repair.

    Lime – This is one of those things that people forget about. Lime is used in outhouses to help keep the odors down, as well as reducing the population of insects.

    It can also be used as a soil amendment even if you have a septic system and don’t need it for the pit toilet.

    Wicking – If you’re going to make candles, you’re going to need wicks for them. While just about any cotton string can be used for that, a cotton string isn’t all that common anymore. A few yards of wicking doesn’t cost all that much and it will allow you to make your own candles.

    We always have at least one roll of cotton butchers cord. Soaked in a salt water brine and dried, it makes a great wick.

    it would be a good idea to have a bunch of candles, already made, on hand.
    I prefer making mine in spaghetti sauce jars and using multiple wicks.

    Jars are OK; but, glass can break. Using the plastic or wax coated cardboard from milk and juice cartons, you can make a candle mold and easily peel it off.

    Insect Repellant – Nobody likes becoming the mosquito’s dinner. Yet there are more of them in the world than there are of us. Good idea to be ready to deal with them and keep them off your body.

    We really like the Off Clip On that has a small fan and works great.
    Setting up bat houses can also attract bats that will eat those pesky insects.
    To be continued.

    Reply to this comment
  20. The Ohio Prepper September 24, 12:53

    Pest Control – Speaking of dealing with insects, it’s a good idea to be able to kill them too, as well as trapping mice and other pests. Don’t skimp, as you won’t be able to run back to the local store for more.

    Cats inside & out take care of this problem.

    Aluminum Foil
    We always have numerous large rolls and use it for everything.

    Charcoal or Propane – Whatever fuel your barbecue grille runs on, be sure to have plenty on hand.

    A charcoal grill can use small pieces of wood.

    That grille is going to be your first alternate stove.

    It’s actually our 5th alternate.
    Propane in the kitchen from the tank farm, Propane in the summer kitchen from our tank farm, Coleman 2-burner dual fuel stove, and a single burner butane stove with 20 fuel canisters.
    We can also cook over an open fire in the back yard.
    You gotta think out of the box.

    You may move to a fire pit later; but in the first month of surviving in the post-disaster world, that grille is it.

    Only with poor planning.

    Cast-iron Pots – Okay, this really isn’t a supply; it’s more like gear. But if you’re going to cook on your barbecue grille, it would be a good idea to have cast-iron cookware on hand. That grille is going to be a bit rough on your Teflon cookware.

    Cooking in a campfire with a Dutch oven is one of the easiest and most versatile ways to cook with cast iron; but, you can also set cast iron pots right on the coals.

    Wind-up Mechanical Clock – Maybe you won’t care about what time it is in a post-disaster world and maybe you will. Either way, it might be a good idea to have a clock that you can count on running when there aren’t any batteries to run it.

    Actually modern LCD clocks will run for years on a coin cell battery and those batteries are inexpensive and have a long shelf life.
    To set your time, put a stick in the ground pointed straight up and when there is no shadow on a sunny day it is local noon.

    Chlorine Bleach degrades quickly, so it’s better to have sodium hypochlorite (pool shock) and make your own as needed.

    Reply to this comment
  21. Steph September 24, 14:37

    Get a distiller. Good for extracting oils, good for making your own alcochol, and good for distilling water to remove all the crap. I personally like the mini sawyer water filters good for 10000 gallons. They also have a community water filter by lifestraw…check it out!!!

    Reply to this comment
  22. left coast chuck September 25, 04:43

    There are so many items that one can use as a fire accelerant that no one needs to spend extra money on things to act as a fire accelerant. Just plain old newspaper, twisted into a taper can act as a fire accelerant. Tear a cardboard box into strips can act similarly. I’ve always used paper to start fires, starting when I was a little kid taking care of the bucket-a-day stove in the basement. Newspaper to start the kindling, kindling to start the bigger chunks of wood, bigger chunks of wood to start the pea coal that the bucket-a-day used. If you twist a half sheet of newsprint into a taper and light it, it acts like a long match, You can use it to ignite several other sheets of paper to ignite the kindling.

    I use two to four sheets of newsprint to start the charcoal in my charcoal chimney.

    By the way, Ohio, thanks for the reference urls. Much appreciated.

    Reply to this comment
    • Wannabe September 25, 12:00

      I agree Chuck. Just have several bags full of paper, card board, brown paper bags, etc… set aside ready to go in a dry area and all is well. Even thin splinters of wood kept dry. Works great every time I start a fire.

      Reply to this comment
      • Cookie September 25, 18:06

        Food, Spices & more check out https://www.thrivelife.com/karinwhitepeters
        The food is great & has a 20-25 year shelf life. We eat it daily & use for camping, hiking, hunting, boating etc.
        Can do a 1 time order or monthly orders.
        Have organizers for cans too from pantry size up tp #10 size.

        Reply to this comment
        • red September 27, 02:49

          That looks like a good site, thank you. I get most spices and so on from ameriherb. When we do a lot of canning, it pays to buy by the pound, and as the medical professionals saw, food is medicine, and at one time all spices we use were our medicine. niio!

          Reply to this comment
  23. Govtgirl September 25, 08:01

    When you say candle in a deep jar are you talking about one of those 1 1/2 in candles in a mayonnaise jar as others were talking about filling a jar with wax and a wick?

    Reply to this comment
  24. lonewolf September 28, 12:21

    stockpiles (of anything) are finite, they only last as long as they last, then they are gone.
    anyone trying to live like they did post SHTF is destined to fail, what you need are skills and knowledge that will last a lifetime, unlike stockpiles.
    eventually we will all have to live like they did in previous times, that’s means growing and rearing your own food, anything else is useless.

    Reply to this comment
View comments

Write a comment

<

Follow Us