What Do I Store in My Pantry As a Prepper?

Rich M.
By Rich M. August 6, 2019 08:48

What Do I Store in My Pantry As a Prepper?

Prepping can take on many different styles. Some preppers focus on bugging in, while others focus on bugging out. There are those who are in the process of turning their homes into homesteads, while others are relying primarily on their stockpiles. Different people learn different skills and even put a different emphasis on learning those skills.

But even with all the diversity that exists in the prepping community, there are things in common. Probably the most central of these is stockpiling food and other supplies, to help us get through a disaster. Most preppers start their prepping right there and are usually still involved in increasing their stockpile, years later.

In this, food is often treated like our number one survival priority, even though it actually comes in third place. Maintaining our body heat and having clean water are higher priorities then food, even though food is also important. What makes those other things more important, is that you can die faster from not having them, than from not having food. Loss of body heat can kill you in 30 minutes, while lack of clean water can kill you in three days.

Even so, the pantry isn’t an appropriate place to store home heating. Your backup heating system probably isn’t going to fit there. Nor is it a good idea to be storing fuel for heating your home in the kitchen, where there can be open flame.

What’s Your Pantry All About?

Before answering the question of what’s stored in your or my pantry, I think it might be a good idea to define the purpose of the pantry. For non-preppers, this is just someplace to store whatever food is bought at the grocery store. But for preppers, it can be much more.

I have changed my view of the pantry to including my short-term disaster food storage. What I mean by that, is that in addition to being the place I look to (besides the refrigerator) when I’m trying to find food to cook or eat, I try to make sure that it has two week’s worth of food in it at all times. Two weeks is enough to get through most short-term disasters, without having to dig into my main food stockpile.

Redoing the Pantry

Two weeks worth of food really isn’t all that much. I’ve shopped on a two week basis for years, going once after each payday and buying pretty much everything I’d need for the next two weeks. So it’s not unrealistic to think in terms of fitting two weeks of food in there. But in reality, I’m fitting more like a month’s worth there, as I try and keep it so that my low point is two weeks. So, how do I do that?

  • Cleanup – Anybody’s pantry is bound to have a bunch of stuff in it, that’s just there because we managed to buy it on sale. Our family doesn’t like it, but we keep it anyway, as if something magical is going to happen and their tastes are going to change. Better to get rid of it or at least move it to your survival stockpile, so that the space can be used for useful things.
  • What Do I Store In My Pantry as a PrepperContainers – Once you get rid of the stuff that’s just taking up space, the next thing I did was to go to standard containers for a lot of my dry food items. The food we buy doesn’t come in all sorts of packaging, which means that when we put it on the shelf, we waste a lot of space. I bought a couple of cases of plastic containers, all the same, from a wholesale supply, mostly to keep ants and mice out of my food. They hold breakfast cereal, various types of baking flour, sugar, pasta, oatmeal and anything else that makes sense. About the only thing I don’t try and put in those containers is canned goods.
  • Standardization – We’ve developed a standard list of food that we keep in the pantry. These are things that we know we’re going to use all the time, like pasta and oatmeal. Before going to the grocery store, we check out levels of those items and buy what we need to have, in order to fill the standard containers or to have as many cans of those items as we consider our normal stocking level. Items that are not part of that standard list, which are bought to try out or to make something special, are stored in another cabinet in the kitchen.

Filling the Pantry

Now, with the pantry properly organized, it’s easy to fit my short-term survival stockpile in it. So, what’s in that stockpile?

Food Items

  • What Do I Store In My Pantry as a PrepperCanned meat – This is pretty much just a survival item, although we occasionally use it. Our canned meat consists of a combination of chicken, salmon, tuna and corned beef. There are some other canned meats available, but those are our favorites.
  • Pasta – We’re a big pasta family; a good source of carbohydrates, with a lot of variety. We stock four different shapes, including spaghetti.
  • Spaghetti Sauce – Not only good for spaghetti, but for covering the flavor of whatever else you might need to hide.
  • Canned Mushroom Soup – Great for turning that pasta into casseroles.
  • Other Condiments – I’m in the habit of buying condiments several bottles or jars at a time. For example, I’ll buy four bottles each of teriyaki sauce, soy sauce and orange sauce, which I mix together to make a marinade for beef jerky. It’s just more efficient to buy it that way.
  • Breakfast Cereal – While not a great survival food, it is something we eat most days.
  • What Do I Store In My Pantry as a PrepperCanned Vegetables – We stock a variety of different vegetables, all lined up neatly on their shelf, just like in the grocery store, so you can readily see what we have. I go full-depth even with ones we don’t use very often, just to have the extras on hand.
  • Canned Fruit – Stocked the same way as the vegetables.
  • Rice – Always useful
  • Flour and Sugar – For baking and other uses. Since we use sugar for homemade fruit drinks, my normal stocking level is about 20 pounds.
  • Other Grains – I like making my breads with a variety of grains. I also like grains, like barley, for use in soups.
  • Instant Oatmeal – While we keep regular oatmeal in our survival stockpile, we use the instant oatmeal packets for everyday. There are plenty of these, removed from their boxes and stuffed into one of my standard plastic containers.
  • Granola Bars – I normally don’t stockpile granola bars as survival food, but I do use them for snacks, especially when in the car or at events away from home. So we’ve always got a bunch of the better quality granola bars in our pantry. They work well as a survival food too.
  • Coffee and the Fixings – We’re a big coffee family, so we keep plenty of coffee around, usually unground beans. I grind them by hand. We also keep flavoring syrups and other goodies to fix our coffee to our personal tastes.
  • Snack Foods – Yes, we do have some junk food in our pantry. I’m just as guilty of eating that as anyone, especially cookies. But I can’t really say that the junk food we have has anything at all to do with survival, unless it’s for surviving stressful days.
  • Water – We have other water storage in our home, but our first use storage is in the pantry. I normally have three cases of water bottles and a half dozen gallons there. That’s enough for a short-term emergency, if all I’m concerned about is drinking water.

Non-Food Items

Since the pantry is my short-term survival stockpile, I need a few things there, which aren’t food items. Just as with the food mentioned above, these items are there for everyday, as well as to get us through those short problem situations.

  • Small Gas Cook Stove and Fuel – In case the gas is out. I can use my barbecue grill as well, but this is small enough to use indoors, in the midst of a storm.
  • Paper Plates and Cups – In a short-term emergency, we’ll use paper plates and cups, so that we don’t have to wash them. I make a point of paper ones, rather than Styrofoam, so that I can use them as fire starting kindling as well.
  • Fire Starting Kit – Not only for the barbecue grille and fire pit, but for cooking as well.
  • Small First-aid Kit – We have a larger kit, but I keep a small one in the pantry to take care of emergencies. It seems like the kitchen is a prime place for accidents and minor injuries.
  • Dog Food – Maybe you don’t have a dog, but I do. We keep the dog food in a five-gallon bucket, with lid, which helps protect it from the occasional mouse that finds its way into our home.

You may also like:

The SHTF Diet: Minimum Food And Water Supply For 3 Months

The Ultimate Survival Tree (Video)

Cheap Foods That You Can Buy At A Mormon Cannery

The 10 Best Prepper Foods You Can Find At Costco

Meal Planning: A Month’s Worth of Survival Food with 2000 Calories per Day

 

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Rich M.
By Rich M. August 6, 2019 08:48
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57 Comments

  1. Grayman August 6, 16:15

    Very good review… All the facts are correct and complete…

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  2. BadOedipus August 6, 16:42

    Do you cycle your canned food so that you are always eating the oldest cans?
    I.e. – putting the most recently purchased cans in the back.

    Reply to this comment
    • efzapp August 6, 23:12

      Check out canned food storage rack on YouTube. You can build one, if you’re handy, or buy one. It works on the FIFO premise, first in, first out. Even though I wanted to build one I acquiesced to my husband and we bought one. it’s great. I know exactly what I need to buy and exactly what I have.

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      • The Ohio Prepper August 7, 02:10

        Efzapp,
        I’ve built a few different designs of FIFO can storage over the years; but, really love the Thrive Life / Shelf Reliance Cansolidator.
        They come in pieces that may be assembled for various can sizes and shelving heights, so you can store the thin tuna cans, small diameter tomato pastes cans, and fruit, vegetable or soup cans, all in the same adjustable assembly.

        Reply to this comment
        • efzapp August 7, 02:48

          The Ohio Prepper, that is what we bought the Shelf Reliance.We just have regular sized cans in it so I was left with about 14′ empty on top. I had the cross bars there and I put wood on them so I have two flat shelves on top. I store odd shaped items there like cocoa powder, a jars of dried beans and pasta. I’m hoping to buy a second one. Great minds, huh!

          Reply to this comment
          • The Ohio Prepper August 7, 09:14

            Efzapp,

            that is what we bought the Shelf Reliance.We just have regular sized cans in it so I was left with about 14′ empty on top. I had the cross bars there and I put wood on them so I have two flat shelves on top. I store odd shaped items there like cocoa powder, a jars of dried beans and pasta.

            We’ve assembled several of them that sit on the wire shelves of the adjustable shelving units, assembled to fit the Cansolidators, and leaving room on shelves above & below for those other odd items.
            With that open top turned into a shelf it sounds like you’ve done something similar, squeezing out all of the space you can on the cheap (inexpensively?).
            We’ve used many of the wire shelving units over the years with a few purchased @ Home Depot for around $80.00; but, the bulk of them purchased @ Aldi’s for about half that price. If you have an Aldi’s in your area, check in the March-May timeframe and then again in the August-September time frame. The early time frame is for sorting, spring cleaning & decluttering and the later time is back to school, off to college and we see them on this schedule regularly around here.

            I’m hoping to buy a second one. Great minds, huh!

            I purchased a Cansolidator Pantry and a Cansolidator Pantry Plus a few years back on sale and paid less than $100.00 for both with free shipping.
            As it turns out, the kits are identical with the
            Pantry Plus just containing more parts in the erector set, so we still have enough for at least one more setup as we get organized.
            It allows us to thumb through things like a variety of soups to find one we’re interested in at that moment; but, also allows easy inventory management, with both the FIFO storage and the
            ”At a Glance” method of knowing when something is running short. High Tech plastics meet Low Tech design for simple inexpensive storage.

            Reply to this comment
            • efzapp August 7, 12:47

              Gee, The Ohio Prepper, I, too, have several of the 72″ tall wire shelving. I have placed mine perpendicular to the wall rather than flat against the wall. I have them 2′ apart. Since I have all the shelves at the same height I have bought 12″ X 12′ boards and placed them across the shelves at the wall so I have U-shaped shelving. It gives me a lot more storage space rather than empty wall. My husband who is not the prepper thought I was crazy until he saw how much more space I had.

              Lucky you on finding the Cansolidator on sale. I’ll have to keep my eye out. And, yes, we have Aldi’s here and I have gotten shelves from them. When I originally started buy them Lowe’s or Home Depot would put them on sale for $39.99.

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              • The Ohio Prepper August 7, 15:49

                efzapp,

                I, too, have several of the 72″ tall wire shelving. I have placed mine perpendicular to the wall rather than flat against the wall. I have them 2′ apart. Since I have all the shelves at the same height I have bought 12″ X 12′ boards and placed them across the shelves at the wall so I have U-shaped shelving. It gives me a lot more storage space rather than empty wall.

                That’s not a bad way to do it since it does add additional storage without a lot of space or expense.
                In our case we have a large house where we can spread things out a bit.
                • 4 units in our summer kitchen, with two of them flat against the wall
                • 3 in the kitchen all flat against the wall with 2 on wheels
                • 1 in the living room on wheels, holing our TV, satellite receiver, DVD player, and video recorder / VHS player
                • One upstairs storeroom has 5, 3 against the wall and 2 floaters on wheels
                • The final upstairs room has 2 against the wall.
                • 2 in my office against the wall for storing Bankers Boxes.
                • And finally we have one more on wheels in the new building we just purchased. The 14×24 foot building was delivered 1 and a half weeks ago and you can see the crew setting it in place here: http://www.theohioprepper.org/NewBuilding/

                My husband who is not the prepper thought I was crazy until he saw how much more space I had.

                I’m lucky in that my wife of 37 years was farm raised not far from where we live, and the rural lifestyle is a prepping lifestyle, even though many would not use that label.

                Lucky you on finding the Cansolidator on sale.
                I’ll have to keep my eye out.

                They do this on occasion and the best way to find out is to drop your email with the ladies who run this site: http://foodstoragemadeeasy.net/ for updates on freeze dried products and items like the Cansolidators.

                And, yes, we have Aldi’s here and I have gotten shelves from them. When I originally started buy them Lowe’s or Home Depot would put them on sale for $39.99.

                We’ve gotten a few @ Home Depot with discounts; but, most have come from Aldi’s, including some smaller versions running around $15.00 that are also handy.
                Home Depot BTW carries the wheel kits for around $20.00 that just screw in where the leveling feet screw in.
                The wheels however reduce the load of the unit to around 150 pounds. From its nominal 1800-2400 pounds total; I found that out the hard way.

                Reply to this comment
                • efzapp August 8, 19:19

                  The Ohio Prepper, thanks for all the info on the Cansolidator and the shelving. I almost bought one of the shelves with wheels but I figured it would throw off my configuration. Glad I didn’t now.

                  Stay prepping,

                  Reply to this comment
                  • The Ohio Prepper August 8, 21:21

                    Efzapp,

                    I almost bought one of the shelves with wheels but I figured it would throw off my configuration. Glad I didn’t now.

                    I’ve never seen them with wheels; but, Home Depot has a wheel kit for around $20.00 that simply screws in where the leveling feet screw in.
                    I know someone who has 5 or 6 shelves with wheels end into the wall with little room between them; but, he can pull them straight out an access both sides of the shelf and then push it back. Just another way to do sompact storage.

                    Reply to this comment
                    • efzapp August 8, 23:27

                      The Ohio Prepper, what I’d really like to do is buy a couple more shelving units and just use the shelves and redo a couple of the ones I have. I’m thinking more shelves with less distance between them. Make them to a specific height to accommodate shorter items so one unit would have more shelves, not 5 but 8 or more. What do you think?

                    • The Ohio Prepper August 9, 02:09

                      Efzapp,

                      what I’d really like to do is buy a couple more shelving units and just use the shelves and redo a couple of the ones I have. I’m thinking more shelves with less distance between them. Make them to a specific height to accommodate shorter items so one unit would have more shelves, not 5 but 8 or more. What do you think?

                      That could work with a couple of thoughts beforehand. We have a 72” shelf parallel to the wall and keep boxed cereal on the top shelf. I’m 5’6” and can easily reach the boxes sitting on the edge; but the wife is about 5’ 4” and has a hard time without a small stepstool. Items in the back or the middle of the top shelf would also be hard for me to reach without a stepstool, so you need to think if you are tall enough or perhaps have a small step stool handy.
                      Assuming you’re placing the units perpendicular to the wall where you can access the shelves from both sides, I don’t see any problem with this, other than perhaps the middle of the very top shelf.
                      The nice thing about these shelving units is that while it may be a PITA to do so, they can be easily disassembled and reconfigured. Taking your height and access into consideration, I think it’s worth a shot.

  3. sunvale August 6, 17:58

    Ammunition, several calibers to use as barter and for your own use

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  4. The Ohio Prepper August 6, 19:56

    In this, food is often treated like our number one survival priority, even though it actually comes in third place. Maintaining our body heat and having clean water are higher priorities then food, even though food is also important. What makes those other things more important, is that you can die faster from not having them, than from not having food. Loss of body heat can kill you in 30 minutes, while lack of clean water can kill you in three days.

    This is how we teach this ”Rule of 3’s” in our classes & seminars.
    You can survive:
    3 seconds without a plan
    3 minutes without air
    3 hours without shelter
    3 days without water
    3 weeks without food
    3 months without hope

    What’s Your Pantry All About?

    Two weeks is enough to get through most short-term disasters, without having to dig into my main food stockpile.
    True and actually a deep pantry for many.
    Working in emergency management, it’s often hard to get people to have the lifesaving 72 hour kit so 14 days is a very good start.

    Redoing the Pantry

    sstrong>Cleanup is something we never do, since we date everything and use it in FIFO (First In First Out) order. Many years ago we would find those old cans suitable for the trash; but, we now organize and manage our food stocks to ensure that doesn’t happen.

    One should also follow the simple rule of: “Buy what you eat & Eat what you buy” that in simple terms, means that you don’t buy a food you don’t like, simply because it was a bargain.

    For containers we use either #10 cans of bulk goods or 5 gallon buckets with reseal able Gamma Lids, placing boxes of dry goods like cereal in them in hot summers, with a desiccant pack to keep out the moisture.

    For store purchased canned goods, we invested in the Thrive Life Cansolidators that makes cans easy to access, rotate, and inventory, plus lots of cans managed this way, takes up very little shelf space

    Other Condiments

    I’m in the habit of buying condiments several bottles or jars at a time. For example, I’ll buy four bottles each of teriyaki sauce, soy sauce and orange sauce, which I mix together to make a marinade for beef jerky. It’s just more efficient to buy it that way.

    You can be more efficient buy purchasing gallon cans of soy sauce at a restaurant outlet and making your own teriyaki sauce.

    Food Items

    Spaghetti Sauce – Not only good for spaghetti, but for covering the flavor of whatever else you might need to hide.

    I find the you might need to hide. kind of funny, since I always think of it as just adding flavor to bland things like beans or rice or dry white meats.

    Flour and Sugar – For baking and other uses. Since we use sugar for homemade fruit drinks, my normal stocking level is about 20 pounds.

    It’s about the same here, plus several gallons each of honey & real maple syrup and a bit of molasses.

    Instant Oatmeal – While we keep regular oatmeal in our survival stockpile, we use the instant oatmeal packets for everyday. There are plenty of these, removed from their boxes and stuffed into one of my standard plastic containers.

    We don’t really like the instant; but, keep regular oatmeal and cream of wheat on hand as well as corn meal that is useful for many things, including a breakfast.

    Snack Foods – Yes, we do have some junk food in our pantry. I’m just as guilty of eating that as anyone, especially cookies. But I can’t really say that the junk food we have has anything at all to do with survival, unless it’s for surviving stressful days.

    We purchase the bags of the small bags of Frito’s snacks and make cookies; but, I think long term this is survival food, since in a long term stressful situation, these comfort foods can bring back an air of normalcy, for at least a moment, relieving some stress.

    Non-Food Items

    Small Gas Cook Stove and Fuel – In case the gas is out. I can use my barbecue grill as well, but this is small enough to use indoors, in the midst of a storm.

    We’re unlikely to run out of gas, since we keep more than 2000 gallons of propane on hand most of the time; but, we also have a two burner Coleman camp stove with fuel and a single burner butane stove with fuel and the ability to build a campfire outside and cook in a really down situation.

    Paper Plates and Cups – In a short-term emergency, we’ll use paper plates and cups, so that we don’t have to wash them. I make a point of paper ones, rather than Styrofoam, so that I can use them as fire starting kindling as well. ,

    Same here, since you can get some really heavy duty plates that don’t drop the food on you lap.

    Fire Starting Kit – Not only for the barbecue grille and fire pit, but for cooking as well.

    Small First-aid Kit – We have a larger kit, but I keep a small one in the pantry to take care of emergencies. It seems like the kitchen is a prime place for accidents and minor injuries.

    Our small kit is kept in a bathroom closet, just a few steps from the kitchen.
    The large one is on wheels and is stored out of the way; but, accessible.

    All in all this is a good article for those not yet up to speed, to use as a guideline.

    Reply to this comment
  5. sum1has2 August 6, 21:11

    My husband and I work jobs where we occasionally receive fifths of alcohol for Christmas tips. We save them for medicinal, antiseptic, barter and obvious reasons. We store them away from any open flames.

    Reply to this comment
  6. NY Mike August 6, 22:22

    Don’t forget wine and spirits. They last forever and make great bartering items.

    Reply to this comment
    • left coast chuck August 6, 23:47

      IvyMike: As I am a wino of many years standing, wine doesn’t last forever unless it is a really great wine to start with. If you invested in a ’74 Lafitte-Rothschild back in ’78 or ’79 when it was released and you have kept it in your root cellar at about 58°F all these years, yes!!! You have a great wine. However, if you bought Two Buck Chuck five years ago and it has been sitting in a kitchen cabinet over the stove since you bought it, it might not be so great. Spirits heavy on alcohol don’t seem to go bad. When I was a young lad my father had a bottle of Old Overholt rye whiskey which he actually kept for medicinal purposes. He would make a toddy of lemon juice, a tablespoon full of sugar and an ounce of OH for colds, take to a hot bath, take his medicine and go to bed and be well in the morning. When I left at 18 to join Uncle Sam’s Misguided Children, he still had a good bit of that Old Overholt in the cupboard and it still tasted as nasty as when it was new, so I know first hand that it is good for at least a decade or longer, open and sitting in the cupboard over the stove.

      If you buy wine, drink it normally, don’t save it. I would probably weep bitter tears if I were saving a magnum of Silver Oak cab and it got lost in an EOTW scenario,

      Reply to this comment
      • left coast chuck August 7, 02:32

        Wrong Mike. Shout be NYMike, not IvyMike. Sorry for the incorrect reference.

        Reply to this comment
      • Ivy Mike August 7, 03:48

        That was NYMike, Ivymike does not store liquor, he goes to the liquor store. In one of Hemingway’s early stories 2 young men getting drunk for the 1st time wonder if they are in danger of alcoholism. One says his father claims not finishing the bottle will make an alcoholic. The other says his dad told him it is opening bottles that makes alcoholics. It all reminds me of a Bukowski story, Chinaski and his girl friend spend the last of their money at the liquor store, line up all the bottles on a shelf and then stay drunk for a week until the liquor is gone, the landlord evicts them, and Chinaski winds up living in the street.
        I’ve always been more the Grasshopper than the Ant, better get my pantry straightened out before the U.S. and China crash the world economy.
        And what about those millions of pigs in China dying of flu, will that bug jump to humans?

        Reply to this comment
        • The Ohio Prepper August 7, 08:43

          Ivy Mike,

          I’ve always been more the Grasshopper than the Ant, better get my pantry straightened out before the U.S. and China crash the world economy.

          I grew up in a family of ants. I owned my first house (no mortgage) by age 30 and owned this property (8 acres with house and 4 outbuildings by age 45 where we are close to self sufficient at least for a year or two with no grid.
          Keep in mind that even that pantry is only to get you through to better times, or until your own food production is up and running.

          And what about those millions of pigs in China dying of flu, will that bug jump to humans?

          While it’s not guaranteed, it’s quite likely, keeping in mind that this is not the first Chinese pig die off.
          When rural Chinese folks (peasants) live with their animals, these viruses often mutate between ducks, chickens, pigs, and humans and have for years. This is why many of our influenza outbreaks are called swine flu or avian flu. With the Chinese lack of free media, the actual number of human influenza cases in China, including deaths is somewhat of a guess; but, Who and CDC are no doubt already working on the probable vectors and types to develop vaccines.
          I get my influenza vaccinations (flu shots) every year and have for at least 20, and that allows me to live a somewhat self reliant lifestyle, hopefully for years to come.

          Reply to this comment
          • IvyMike August 9, 00:57

            If (haha, big ifs are a dime a dozen) I was starting life over with at least a bit of the knowledge I now have I hope I would become a homesteader, it is such a cool way to live. And love that there are still folks around who know the fable of the Grasshopper and the Ant. It’s like when LeftCoastChuck mentions something like playing mumbleypeg. Who knows these things anymore?

            Reply to this comment
    • The Ohio Prepper August 7, 02:14

      Actually I don’t know that wine lasts forever; but, kept sealed, most spirits keep indefinitely.
      We keep some 86 proof dark rum on hand because I like rum.
      We also have some 151 and 190 proof PGA that is kept primarily for making tinctures for actual medicinal use.

      Reply to this comment
      • left coast chuck August 9, 03:07

        Ohio: As with any general statement, there are always exceptions. Generally wine with alcoholic content in the 13% to 15% range if sufficient tannins and sugars are present in the wine from the start will age quite nicely if stored in the dark, undisturbed at a temperature in the range of 58°F. Generally red wines fall in that category. However there are white wines with a very high sugar content that also store quite well under the same circumstances. They are generally in the sauterne varietal of wines. Wines without much in the way of sugar or tannins generally do not store well and are best drunk when “young”

        Then there are the fortified wines which store quite nicely due to the fact that they have been fortified with a high alcohol beverage, usually brandy. Those include: port sherry, amontillado, madeira, marsala, commandaria and aromatized wines such a vermouth. I have maintained for many years without madeira we would still be a part of the British Empirette. (That’s the shrunken modern version of the British Empire) Madeira was a heavy favorite during the 18th century. The boys would gather down at the tavern and pretty soon the discussion would turn to what lousy folks the Brits back in Jolly Old England were. Things went downhill from there. Under proper storage methods those fortified wines keep very nicely. In fact, port usually doesn’t start to hit its stride until it is 20 or more years old. Of course there are poor quality ports that no matter how old they are will never be great ports. It will just be old poor quality port. You will know when a wine has turned. It will be vinegar and not good vinegar either. It will probably have funky stuff floating in it too.

        Reply to this comment
        • The Ohio Prepper August 9, 20:28

          left coast chuck,
          Good information on wines. I drink an occasional glass of sweet wine, a good beer (Stoney’s or Bass), a Mikes Hard Lemonade, and most sweet things mixed with dark rum; but, actually just don’t drink much alcohol.,

          Reply to this comment
          • red August 18, 06:39

            I’m with you, but after SHFT beer and wine won’t be just for social occasions, but food and for health concerns. A glass of beer has all the nutrients as the sprouts it was made of, and with added protein. Wine will be common in houses that want to survive without scurvy, and so on.

            Reply to this comment
  7. Elaine August 6, 22:23

    Was salt mentioned??? Were mason jars mentioned? I always read that salt and sugar (as well as cigarettes, alcohol and coffee) were all things you could easily store to barter for other stuff

    Reply to this comment
    • The Ohio Prepper August 7, 02:25

      Elaine,
      Salt and canning jars may make good barter items; but, they are actually rather good items to have on hand for your own use.
      We always have at least several dozen assorted size canning jars with lids and rings on hand, purchased in quantity when on sale.
      Salt may of course be used for cooking as well as for preservation of foods.
      We always have a few pounds of iodized salt for cooking needs; but, always have at least 250 pounds of water softener salt. Softener salt is just plain salt, and will get used for the water softener; but, it may also be ground and used for cooking or food preservation. Purchasing it in large bags for the softener is rather inexpensive, and makes it a multiuse item, which is always a good thing.
      Long term however, you might need to add an iodine source like kelp tablets.

      Reply to this comment
    • left coast chuck August 7, 02:42

      All of those are commodities that would be tradable in an EOTW situation. You should stockpile both iodized salt and non-iodized salt. You need the iodized to avoid goiter. Before salt was iodized goiter was a common ailment among folks who lived inland from the ocean. While goiter is not an especially life-threatening condition symptoms caused by an enlarged thyroid gland can be debilitating.

      No need to stock tons of iodized salt, we don’t need iodine by the fistful. You use it to season table food and you get all the iodine you need.

      Non-iodized salt is necessary for preserving meat and fish. You can’t have too much of that.

      If you have tradable quantities of any or all of the above, you will be popular in an EOTW situation. You also will be the target of folks who are of the opinion that what’s yours is theirs and what’s theirs is theirs. They will not be adverse to helping themselves at your expense.

      Reply to this comment
      • The Ohio Prepper August 8, 08:22

        left coast chuck,
        Since iodized salt doesn’t work well for some canning an preservation techniques like pickling, we keep a lot of plain salt with hundred of pounds stored for the softener.
        Another good and inexpensive source of iodine for the diet can be found in Kelp tablets; but,, one should not exceed 200-250 mcg per day as a supplement. Eggs & prunes contain quite a bit as does most seafood, for those living where it would be available.

        Reply to this comment
  8. Chaya August 7, 02:58

    We keep the following additions in our pantry because it’s not our long term storage area and these turn over fairly regularly:

    Oils – olive, corn, coconut, avocado, grape seed
    Salts – pink, black, applewood smoked, grey
    Various condensed soups – cream of mushroom and cream of chicken make great casserole bases
    Crackers – saltine, Graham, wheat thins, etc
    Juices – cranberry, flavored electrolytes, grape, v8, energy drinks and CO2 canisters for making sparkling water or sodas
    Specialty items – sodium hydroxide (Pretzels), Hirschhorn saltz, baking powder, baking soda, decorating sugars
    Dried mushrooms- morels, various dried fungi
    Dried fruits – papaya, cantaloupe, apricot, cherries, pineapple, dates, raisins, kiwi,
    Nuts – walnuts, hazelnuts, almonds, pecans

    There are also dog treats and long term chewies. We have 3 dogs that are family members to spoil once in a while.

    Reply to this comment
    • The Ohio Prepper August 7, 09:54

      Chayam

      We keep the following additions in our pantry because it’s not our long term storage area and these turn over fairly regularly:

      We don’t have a specific long term storage and short term pantry area, except for some cases of #10 cans of grains and items purchased from the local LDS Bishops Storehouse.

      Oils – olive, corn, coconut, avocado, grape seed

      We keep canola & corn oil in one of the refrigerators, and lots of olive oil in the freezer where it will keep indefinitely.

      Salts – pink, black, applewood smoked, grey

      We only have normal iodized and non-iodized table salt, some kosher & pink salt, and a ton of water softener salt we can grind up if we need it.

      Various condensed soups – cream of mushroom and cream of chicken make great casserole bases

      We do the same there; but, tomato can also be used as a base along with copious amounts of tomato paste and tomato sauce. We also keep a fair number of Progresso soups for convenience, since they are pull-top and ready to heat & eat.

      Juices – cranberry, flavored electrolytes, grape, v8, energy drinks and CO2 canisters for making sparkling water or sodas

      No way to make sparkling water; but, we use a lot of V8 and Gatorade powder.

      Specialty items – sodium hydroxide (Pretzels), Hirschhorn saltz, baking powder, baking soda, decorating sugars

      We don’t keep our sodium hydroxide in the pantry with the food, since it may be used for other things and may be quite caustic.
      Since baking powder can easily go stale, we don’t use it; but, do keep quantities of Cream of Tartar (tartaric Acid) and baking soda on hand, to make our own when we need it. My favorite cookie, Snickerdoodles uses that combination in the recipe.

      Dried fruits – papaya, cantaloupe, apricot, cherries, pineapple, dates, raisins, kiwi

      We keep most of those, except cantaloupe and kiwi; but, also some freeze dried versions, some of which we make on our own when in season.

      Nuts – walnuts, hazelnuts, almonds, pecans

      And peanuts, peanut butter, and peanut butter powder since they’re inexpensive and useful for both snacks & ingredients.

      One final thing is a lot of garlic & onions, both fresh and dried / minced.

      Reply to this comment
      • left coast chuck August 7, 22:22

        Ohio Prepper: If you want to make sparkling beverages you can buy a device that injects CO2 into any beverage. If you watch movies from the 30s on late late late night TV you will see the suave, debonaire man about town squirting homemade seltzer water into his scotch and soda. You insert your standard 12 oz CO2 cartridge in the device add water and voila! Seltzer water or carbonated orange juice if that is what floats your boat.

        Technology is really old. Many decades ago in my callow youth I was a soda jerk. The fountain contained the syrups that made the soda and CO2 and water made them all fizzy and diluted enough to drink. We could make the drink stronger or weaker depending upon how many pumps of the syrup we put into the drink. I don’t know how much before the turn of the 19th century soda fountains came into being, perhaps it was after the turn. Certainly by the 1920s soda fountains were ubiquitous.

        Actually, after paper boy, soda jerk was my first job paying 30¢ an hour which was the minimum wage at that time.

        Reply to this comment
        • The Ohio Prepper August 8, 07:58

          left coast chuck,

          Ohio Prepper: If you want to make sparkling beverages you can buy a device that injects CO2 into any beverage.
          . . . .
          You insert your standard 12 oz CO2 cartridge in the device add water and voila! Seltzer water or carbonated orange juice if that is what floats your boat.

          I am well aware of the devices, with the most prevalent being SodaStream; but, my boat floats mostly with noncarbonated beverages with the exception of a root beer float (root beer & vanilla ice cream) or the occasional cold beer.

          Technology is really old. Many decades ago in my callow youth I was a soda jerk. The fountain contained the syrups that made the soda and CO2 and water made them all fizzy and diluted enough to drink. We could make the drink stronger or weaker depending upon how many pumps of the syrup we put into the drink. I don’t know how much before the turn of the 19th century soda fountains came into being, perhaps it was after the turn. Certainly by the 1920s soda fountains were ubiquitous.

          That’s interesting since I had that same job for a while in my late teens (mid to late 1960’s). Several local drug stores had soda fountains where you could mix soda water with coke syrup and then add additional flavors like cherry, lemon, or chocolate, with chocolate being my least favorite.
          We also had some of the so called ”Five & Dime” stores like Ben Franklin, W.T. Grant, Kresge’s, and McCrory Stores all of which had ”lunch counters” serving breakfast & lunch (mostly sandwiches) with that same ubiquitous soda fountain.

          Actually, after paper boy, soda jerk was my first job paying 30¢ an hour which was the minimum wage at that time.

          I also started out as a paper boy, carrying two morning routes and an after school route, the combination of which paid something like $18-20 per week or $5-6 per route. The great thing about that job was Christmas, where 350 subscribers usually gave you cash ranging from $1.00 to $5.00 with the occasional $10 or $20 bill.
          Working as both a soda jerk and a restraint bus boy, gave me spending money and help put some away for college.
          I was heavy into photography and purchased film, paper, and chemicals from the local (no joke) ”Acme Photo” and ended up working there for a whopping $1.00 per hour; but, that job helped me get another one In college making $1.75 as a photo technician, all of which helped pay for schooling.
          I come to these forums to discuss preparedness things and occasionally fall into a thread like this, taking a walk down memory lane, remembering and discussing things long ago; but, not forgotten.
          Thanks for the send off on this trip. LOL.

          Reply to this comment
  9. Patrick Henry August 7, 22:08

    Don’t forget Medicine, vitamins, coffee & a few sweets.

    Reply to this comment
    • The Ohio Prepper August 8, 08:11

      Patrick ,

      Don’t forget Medicine, vitamins, coffee & a few sweets.

      I don’t drink coffee; but, the wife cannot live without it, so we have quite a stash of it in one of the freezers, plus a good supply of K-Cups.
      For sweeteners we generally keep generic Sucralose and Aspartame packets, plus 40 or more pounds of cane sugar, molasses, a few quarts of maple syrup and a few gallons of honey.
      In the past we made our own honey, (actually had the bees do it for us) and will be doing this again and I also make my own maple syrup & maple sugar / maple sugar candy, so no lack of sweeteners around.

      Reply to this comment
    • Chaya August 13, 17:05

      We keep our medical supplies in the guest bathroom in a shelf unit. While not officially pantry, we keep:

      Isopropyl alcohol – 75 & 90
      Hydrogen peroxide
      Antibiotic ointment
      Bandages
      Dental emergency kits
      Toothpaste
      Mouthwash
      Soaps
      Mineral oil
      Epsom salts
      Peptobismol
      Tums – simethicone
      Merthiolate – iodine
      Suture kits
      Hemostats
      IV kits
      Shampoo / conditioner
      Powdered charcoal- activated
      Witch hazel
      Benedryl ointment
      Poison ivy soap

      Everything is FIFO managed.

      Reply to this comment
      • The Ohio Prepper August 13, 23:22

        Chaya,
        Good list; but, you might want to add a thermometer, pulse Oximeter and a BP cuff.
        These have all gotten very inexpensive and can help you diagnose and manage some issues.

        Reply to this comment
        • Chaya August 14, 11:03

          The Ohio Prepper,

          Yup, have the BP cuff and thermometers but not the Oximeter. Have to look into that.

          Reply to this comment
          • The Ohio Prepper August 14, 14:45

            Chaya,
            As I stated to Clergylady earlier in this forum. I have several pulse Oximeters of the type that go on your fingertip.. These run on 2 AAA batteries and ran under $15.00 each.

            Reply to this comment
  10. Clergylady August 9, 04:14

    All interesting comments.
    I dehydrate and can fruits and vegetables. I used to freeze but don’t do that anymore. I can can as little as 3 pints at a time in pressure or water bath canners. Mostly I aim for full loads in the canners. I buy caselots of things we like such as canned chili con carne – on sale – when I can. We keep assorted canned meats and fish on hand. When I have power for the mini fridge there is fresh meat and milk as well. Often salad makings as well. Tomatoes sit in a bowl on the counter. There is a well stocked baking supply area. There are rice and pasta mixes that we enjoy now and then. They store in fiber board barrels that are food grade. I happen to use them as end tables in my small living room. Its all one big open room with the kitchen so they are close if wanted. They hold close to 5 gallons of volumn. That’s a lot of food. I plan to get a couple more for other storage.
    We have seeds ahead and save seeds from each harvest. I harvest from our garden and forrage as well.
    I have both propane stoves and wood/pellet heat and wood cooking ability outside. There is lots of wood outside. I have hand saws, gas chainsaw and a smaller electric chainsaw. Our home is off grid solar with a plug in on the battery controller box so I can plug in a wood chipper or chainsaw so trash size limbs can burn through the pellet hopper on my heating stove. The heating stove has a 16″ round top on the heat collector where I keep 3 gal of water hot, fry potatoes and heat a tea kettle.
    I have a small old washing machine but when we were without electricity and the array was being rebuilt I washed laundry in 3, 5 gallon buckets. Wash, rinse, rinse. Used a new toilet plunger to do most of the agitation motion. It worked well. Light was a mix of battery and lamp oil lamps. I make candles so we used a lot of those. In winter I burned candles under pots of water or oil to help collect and use the heat. Heavy ceramic pots will do the same thing.
    We take life as it comes and just handle it. That’s what we’d have to do if SHTF. Stay, camp on the mountain above us or drive away. You just do what needs to be done. I have tools, seasonal, survival kits and first aid kits in each vehicle. I aim to always fill up the gas tank before I come home. There are backpacks with necessary papers, food and a way to prepare it, surgical first aid, seasonal clothing, and more. All ready to grab and go. One pack has a pistol and ammo with more underwater and extra pairs of warm socks. By the door are two long bows and arrows on hooks. Behind the bedroom door are a medium sized crossbow with a few dozen bolts and a wrist rocket that can shoot marbles, stones or even arrows. Coats are by the front door in a free standing small closet. I have two bicycles in the shed next to the parked vehicles. A medium motor home could go but it doesn’t get great mileage. It is ready to camp in at any time. If I need to drive away I’d probably take one of the trucks. F250 4×4 crewcab or a smaller Ranger with a camper shell on it and air mattresses with bedding ready to use.
    I’d prefer to hunker down and stay home. I have 2 wells here. One on commercial power and the other capped but accessible to set up a hand winch.
    In the shop and in the kitchen I use an assortment of antique hand tools. I have several electric sewing machines but I also have a treadle machine that works beautifully. I’m wanting to replace an old set of long range walkie talkies.
    We use solar lights on pathways, inside by windows so my husband will have lights. In the room with my rabbits there is a solar light with the panel outside and motion activated light inside. Walk in, leave a hand and the light comes on. Set it at the longest setting before it turns off. Handy at cleaning or feeding time.
    I have a solar battery charger and solar phone charger. Those are part of our daily life.
    Our old Mama cat keeps us in New cute mouse catchers now and then. I have motion sensors that let me know when something at a set height moves. My little dog does much the same thing and is cuddly as well.
    I’d like to get a large dog. Perhaps German Shepherd. Not sure I have the time with caretaking a husband with Alzheimer’s. I’d want the dog to be well trained. That takes persistence and patience. Still a well trained dog is pure gold in protection and warning. Could also be a helper with hunting provisions if you teach the dog to relinquish what it catches. In a survival situation that could be survival. But be sure your hunter is getting a fair share of food.
    There is a lot that can be done ahead of time. Mostly it takes planning and follow through.
    I haven’t purchased or made shelves that rotate canned goods. That would be handy.

    Reply to this comment
    • efzapp August 9, 12:39

      Clergylady, my hat is off to you. You are an awesome woman doing everything you list and still taking care of your husband. May God give you strength and bless you.

      Reply to this comment
    • The Ohio Prepper August 10, 02:43

      Clergylady,
      First of all, you seem to lead a very well put together lifestyle, and anyone would be happy to know you in an EOTW situation.

      I dehydrate and can fruits and vegetables. I used to freeze but don’t do that anymore.

      We dehydrate, freeze, freeze dry, and can fruits & vegetables. We do a lot of freezing and have most of half an Angus beef (300+ pounds) in one of the freezers, so here we use a mix of preservation & storage methods.

      I can can as little as 3 pints at a time in pressure or water bath canners. Mostly I aim for full loads in the canners.

      It’s the same here; but, like you, we try for full loads, since the full load uses less fuel overall for processing, since one can or a full load takes about as much heat and time.

      I buy caselots of things we like such as canned chili con carne – on sale – when I can.

      We do this quite often for commercially canned items like baked beans, and some fruits and vegetables, usually from Aldi’s.

      We keep assorted canned meats and fish on hand.

      Great minds think alike, LOL. Chicken, Tuna, Salmon, and Sardines are almost always abundant in the pantry.

      There is a well stocked baking supply area.

      Ours is just a shelf, not really an area; but, the same here also with various flours, flavorings, and a small amount of baking powder, with a significant amount of baking soda and cream of tartar (Tartaric acid) on hand to make our own.
      We also keep a large amount of grains, especially wheat and have several ways to grind into flour. The ability to make our own flour from a storable grain and the baking soda and cream of tartar to make our own baking powder, gives us a much longer shelf life than just flour & baking powder alone.

      There are rice and pasta mixes that we enjoy now and then.

      We always have a good supply of a variety of Knorr pasta sides and the soup mixes from Bear Creek.

      We have seeds ahead and save seeds from each harvest. I harvest from our garden and forrage as well.

      It’s much the same here, with forage for only a few types of berries (black raspberries & mulberries) and rose hips, all when in season. We also have tons of black walnuts; but, those often go to waste or to seed making little trees, since the work involved for the meat you get is not time & cost effective. In an EOTW event where you have lots of time, this could of course change.

      I have both propane stoves and wood/pellet heat and wood cooking ability outside. There is lots of wood outside.

      We have wood heat from an air tight fireplace insert as backup, with propane as the primary. A gas forced air furnace and two ventless heaters are connected to our tank farm, as is the gas range & oven, the water heater and the whole house generator. The tank farm can hold about 3000 gallons, and was just recently topped off with our summer fill of 1423 gallons. We also have buddy heaters and both 20# BBQ style tanks with adapter hose & 14 & 16 oz cylinders.
      A 2 burner Coleman camp stove and single burner butane stove with adequate fuel on hand finishes this for inside cooking with a BBQ grill and fire ring outside and plenty of fuel for both.

      I have hand saws, gas chainsaw and a smaller electric chainsaw.

      We have a 40 year old Stihl that still runs quite well as well as a smaller gas powered saw, along with small electric & battery electrics and a pole saw.
      A few hand saws, several axes, a splitting maul, sledge & wedges finish off the basic wood gathering tools. As I get older I’m not excited with using that maul and have been considering a splitter.

      Used a new toilet plunger to do most of the agitation motion. It worked well.

      They make a purpose built ”Off Grid Clothes Washer” that looks like a big plunger; but, I have also used a plunger in a pinch and it works rather well. It’s called the ”Breathing Mobile Washer”

      Light was a mix of battery and lamp oil lamps. I make candles so we used a lot of those. In winter I burned candles under pots of water or oil to help collect and use the heat. Heavy ceramic pots will do the same thing.

      We have numerous LED flashlights, headlamps and lanterns, with the newer versions really getting bright and inexpensive; but, still have Aladdin and Coleman mantle lanterns with plenty of fuel on hand.
      For extra heat you can invert a Terra Cotta flower pot over a gas burner or even a few candles and when the ceramic gets hot, it radiates a nice warm heat. For candles (or Sterno) you need to set the bottom (top lip of inverted pot) on a pencil or something to allow air flow into the system. The drain hole becomes the chimney and the pot can get quite warm.

      We take life as it comes and just handle it. That’s what we’d have to do if SHTF. Stay, camp on the mountain above us or drive away. You just do what needs to be done.

      With the exception of a short term bug out to avoid a noxious cloud of something coming our way, or a house fire, we plan to shelter in place, along with some local MAG members, all of whom bring skills or security to the mix.

      I have tools, seasonal, survival kits and first aid kits in each vehicle. I aim to always fill up the gas tank before I come home.

      We have seasonal car kits and have always used the maxim: ”Half is empty” for fuelling the vehicles, since an emergency could easily mean 20-80 miles to reach a medical facility.

      One pack has a pistol and ammo with more underwater and extra pairs of warm socks.

      I carry a handgun with me most of the time, as well as extra ammunition.

      I’d prefer to hunker down and stay home. I have 2 wells here. One on commercial power and the other capped but accessible to set up a hand winch.

      Our plan is also to Bug In (”Shelter in place”. We have only a single good well; but, the generator is quite capable of running the pump and all refrigeration equipment, with plenty of fuel and consumables on hand at all times.
      We also have a creek running through the property and ponds and rain catchment and ways to purify or filter the water.

      In the shop and in the kitchen I use an assortment of antique hand tools.

      I prefer my Ryobi ONE+ battery tools; but, also have older tools like a Draw Knife, hand saws, an old style block plane and sanding blocks I hope to never need.

      I have several electric sewing machines but I also have a treadle machine that works beautifully.

      We have two machines including an old treadle machine that’s been converted to use an electric motor. One of my projects is to get the treadle pieces and get that working again, eventually.

      I’m wanting to replace an old set of long range walkie talkies.

      What do you call long range?
      I’ve been a ham operator working in communications for more than 40 years and the term ”Long Range” is very subjective. Most often the range of a radio is base mostly on the height of its antenna. If we were on opposites sides of a mountain with 100 watts each, we may not be able to communicate; but, with both on top of the mountains, even a little FRS radio running 500 mw (0.5 watts) might easily communicate 10 or more miles.

      We use solar lights on pathways, inside by windows so my husband will have lights. In the room with my rabbits there is a solar light with the panel outside and motion activated light inside. Walk in, leave a hand and the light comes on. Set it at the longest setting before it turns off. Handy at cleaning or feeding time.

      We use them also, and some of the new solar lights are amazingly bright. I can recommend the ”Atomic Beam Sun Blast” or its generics. The originl was an “As seen on TV” device running $20.00; but, I just purchased two generic versions for $25.00 total from Amazon.

      I have a solar battery charger and solar phone charger. Those are part of our daily life.

      We also have those; but, only for emergencies, although we use them to make sure all is working. Once again, the electronics are getting really inexpensive.

      I have motion sensors that let me know when something at a set height moves.

      We have the same, wireless for intrusion detection, purchased from Harbor Freight for around $10.00 with a coupon.

      There is a lot that can be done ahead of time. Mostly it takes planning and follow through.

      It’s a continuous evaluation and improvement. As you learn, you find the holes and plug them in a continuous cycle. Early lighting was candle and wick or mantle based lanterns, then ”Usable LED lights”; but, some inexpensive, very bright and efficient LED lighting is now the norm.

      I haven’t purchased or made shelves that rotate canned goods. That would be handy.

      We purchased the Cansolidators from Shelf Reliance and love them and as I mentioned above to efzapp, that there are some ladies who run a Thrive Life site with the occasional sale. with the best way to find out is to drop your email with the ladies who run this site: http://foodstoragemadeeasy.net/ for updates on freeze dried products and items like the Cansolidators.
      Prepping is a continuous life style and you seem to have things well in hand.

      Reply to this comment
  11. red August 9, 08:50

    Vinegar. Natural, homemade or bought in a store, vinegar is high in a lot of minerals and Vitamin C. It’s a purifier, medicinal, flavoring agent, and so on, and easy to make from grain or fruit. 5 gallons of nopale (prickly pear) juice are in storage and the remains of the fruit are in a covered bucket to make vinegar. Rice dough is made of fermented rice, and the water is rice wine vinegar. A plus, if stored right (sealed in jugs) vinegar will keep for years without degrading. Honey is another food that should be stockpiled without loss of value. Unlike sugar, it is a food, not just flavoring.

    Reply to this comment
    • Clergylady August 9, 19:16

      I buy and keep white, wine, and cider vinegars. I have a quart of nopale juice from two years ago that I never heated or sealed just as an experiment. It fermented into a pretty descent wine but left sitting it should turn to vinegar. That’s what I’m after to see how it turns out. It never spoiled as in rotten, nor did it grow a mold. It made a tasty wine but I wanted to see what it would do in the long term unsealed. So far it’s still a very tasty wine. Nothing was added to it. When I make wine I usually add some sugar to help the fermentation along. I think I like this full bodied wine even better. So the experiment is good how ever it ends up.
      I also save water in my home for short term emergencies. I have 2 , 5 gallon containers and 2 , 2 1/2 gallon containers at all times. That would give me a bit of time to set up the winch system to draw water from my capped well. The winch is an old hand cranked one taken from a boat trailer that was abandoned here. I’ve added a longer cable. Ultimately I plan to set that well up with a solar powered pump and a pressure tank for home use and some diverted to a couple of 330 gallon storage containers for the garden. I also have 4, 330 gallon totes for rain barrels when I can get the gutters for my mobile home and larger sheds. Two of those will be for my critters. The rest will be for garden and fruit trees. We will have the fresh well water for home use with or without power.
      On the desert water is precious. If the monsoon rains don’t come or if they pass over too quickly everything must be watered. Not just the garden but the fruits and berries as well, so they will survive. I bought the 330 gallon totes for $75 each. I also have a 275 gallon tote. Definately not for drinking water. It contained liquid fertilizer.
      I also have 3, 55gallon food grade barrels that potable water can be stored in. They aren’t set up yet. To be used they must be protected from freezing. I’d like to set them in the planned walipini or pit greenhouse. I can set a small solar pump to pump water up to a place where I could get the water. The planned root celler will be next to the walipini.
      If we were going to drink the rain water it would need to be filtered. The well water tests as clean. So for the present time I keep well water for stored drinking water.
      I’m not sure how RO water would be. I don’t have that here. I enjoyed it at my last home. I keep my well water for an average of one year at a time and it’s still good when we change out for fresh water in the 15 gallons of containers I have in the kitchen. The old water goes into the top of a 330 gallon tote of water for the garden. It will eventually be connected to the soaker hoses in the garden. I have to reduce the bottom valve from 2″ down to 3/4″ to fit the hose. Easy to do. It just takes a few parts. I just got those 330 gallon totes a couple of weeks ago. I’ve already been adding water to one tote so I don’t waste the water.
      There are many things to consider in planning what to save and how to save it. If you aren’t sure on something ask. I’m sure someone will have a answer. The articles are interesting but usually become a starting point for discussions.

      Reply to this comment
      • The Ohio Prepper August 9, 20:04

        Clergylady,

        I also save water in my home for short term emergencies. I have 2 , 5 gallon containers and 2 , 2 1/2 gallon containers at all times.

        We keep two 5-gallon buckets with loose fitting lids (to keep out the bugs & dirt) full of water at all times. We have a good well & a whole house generator; but, even with that, we’ve had a pump fail a few times over the years, and each bucket provides enough water for 3 toilet flushes with modern low (1.6 gallons per flush) toilets.

        If we were going to drink the rain water it would need to be filtered. The well water tests as clean. So for the present time I keep well water for stored drinking water.

        Look on Amazon for the ”Gravity Water Filter Kit for DIY Purifier, Includes .2 Micron Ceramic Filter, Pre Filter, Dispenser, and Instructions by SHTFandGO” and for around $30.00 and your own food grade buckets, you can easily build your own system, I’ve built several.

        I’m not sure how RO water would be.

        All of our cooking and drinking water comes from our R/O system and we love it. It’s about as pure as you can get water.

        There are many things to consider in planning what to save and how to save it. If you aren’t sure on something ask. I’m sure someone will have a answer. The articles are interesting but usually become a starting point for discussions.

        I would agree and most of the best information is passed in those discussions.

        Reply to this comment
      • red August 18, 05:58

        Yo, I’m back! Red’s little adventure went well. New heart valve, and no ciggies for 5 day, caught a lung infection and always do when I quit. I got so many needle tracks, it’s like thank God the cops didn’t stop us. I would have been hauled off on general principals 🙂 I have to say, I have never gotten better treatment than at a VA. Any neolib state and they know I’m another mongrel half-breed rednig and I get the bum’s rush and very little treatment.

        You will succeed. You always have because you’re smart and willing. No matter the adversity, folks like you are leaders because you’re the success we all look up to.

        When I made the nopale vinegar, I saved the cooked pulp from juicing and seeded that with yeast. A short time later, no sugar added, I had vinegar. Vinegar is something I’m stocking up on this year, and trying to not buy much. With all the apple juice jugs, I’ll have plenty. It’s so easy to make, why bother? It can store for decades and retain all vitimins. The old timers used to mix vinegar with water to drink to kill parasites. I think it took only a tablespoon or two, but no one should trust well water and creeks are never safe. The FDA claims there’s not a water source anywhere that is safe. Not even tap water. So, coffee and tea are primary, and not a lot of coffee as its loaded with potassium and can dehydrate.

        No rain since last Sunday but the garden looked good. 2 plants were severely wilted, one in a bucket, the other the chimoyo that survived winter, and sits over a ledge of caliche. Even the beans in the planters were healthy. The tepary beans are in bloom. They like it on the dry side, so I try to lay off irrigating them. It’s not good for them, anyway, and they can develop root rot. Native to the desert, hot and dry are their season.

        Anyway, right now I look like someone took the woman’s ax to me for witchcraft 🙂 Split me right down the breastbone. I had a great-grandmother who escaped the rez in Ela, NC, for a few little oddities. They came so close the ax cut hair off the back of her head. I bet that added a little fire to her run. Maybe made her run all the way to western Virginia, to the Willies.

        All good things must come to an end. I met a Navajo metis prepper and gave him this site. Got a German very interested in it, as well.

        Reply to this comment
  12. Chuckster59 August 9, 15:14

    Turning the conversation to water and water storage…If I have a reverse osmosis (RO) water system, should I be saving water from it for SHTF or plain tap water? I know that having city-treated water includes chlorine but if I treat my RO for long-term storage in a plastic BPA-free 55 gallon drum with a product such as this – https://www.amazon.com/Preserver-Concentrate-Emergency-Preparedness-Earthquake/dp/B0010OI5WK

    am I better off or doesn’t really matter?

    Reply to this comment
    • The Ohio Prepper August 9, 20:22

      Chuckster59,

      If I have a reverse osmosis (RO) water system, should I be saving water from it for SHTF or plain tap water?

      It depends on your system and the intended use of the water.
      My RO system has an 8 gallon pressure tank that holds the product, so it will provide up to 8 gallons, even with no incoming water.

      I know that having city-treated water includes chlorine but if I treat my RO for long-term storage in a plastic BPA-free 55 gallon drum with a product such as this (URL deleted) am I better off or doesn’t really matter?

      The information on the additive doesn’t really say much; but, I would keep the RO water in clear bottles or just store the chlorinated water and have a way for a quick boil before drinking, since that will drive off the chlorine. You could also allow the chlorinated water to just sit out in the open, covered with a towel or cheesecloth to keep out the bugs, for 24 hours and the chlorine will leave.
      Pure water with no living contaminants will keep indefinitely all by itself; but, a quick boil and the aeration by pouring it back and forth between two containers will make it taste better.

      Reply to this comment
  13. Clergylady August 10, 22:27

    I have 1400w, 9KW, and a welder generator. They are handy but I don’t have a lot of fuel storage capability here. Maybe someday. I depend on wood/pellets for my heat. The mobile home is just over 3 years old, purchased last year as a repo. It had propane forced air heat, water heater, and pipe for a stove connection. I bought a 250 gallon tank but before its hooked up I need a trench for the pipe. The gas company guy that does that shattered his arm and can’t run the trencher. My neighbor started digging it with my tractors backhoe. About 6 ft into that it started leaking hydraulic fluid. He took the tractor up to his place to check it out. Its a dented filter that’s pouring out fluid. So I’ve had to wait till I could get a filter and a bucket of hydrolic fluid. Now we’re waiting till he has time to get to it. School is about to start and his days will be freed up. He and his wife are raising 4 teenagers, 2 toddlers- grand children and a 2 month old great grandson. It’s been so long since we had central heat or hot running water that we’re quite content without. I’ll fill the tank someday just for my cookstove and as winter backup. For now the stove is hooked up to a 5 gallon gas bottle.
    I dry the laundry on folding frames. One larger one is free standing or folds almost flat. The other two mount on interior doors and fold out as needed. Someday I may get outside clotheslines. One step at a time.
    The garden is doing well but isn’t as large as I ultimately want. The tomatoes are blooming like crazy and starting to set like crazy. They were setting and blooming but just a few blooms at a time. The green beans will be ready to pick in a few days. The red and yellow watermelons vines are running like crazy and blooming some. Same for the cucumber and I see some setting. We ate the first yellow squashes yesterday with diced onion and a bit of browned hamburger. Seasoned lightly and a bit of real butter, it made a meal for two. We eat seasonally.
    Mostly I want folks to know they can live prepared to meet most disasters. I live on social security. We live frugally. I have to save up for every major purchase. We live carefully budgeting to save for things we need or want.
    I take advantage of Craigslist and often drive an hour each way to get a pickup full of things we want and need. Sunday after church I’m planning to pickup 4 free serama hens. Cute tiny chickens. Three weeks ago I picked up a new looking rabbit cage. That is what serama chickens are raised in. Somehow it all seems to fall together. They lay about 4x a week. Tiny eggs like quail eggs. The birds at full maturity weight about 1 lb and eat very little. They mature early. These are 4 months old and already laying regularly. My regular chickens are mostly free range and forrage food all day long. They show up for some grain every morning. The serama eat smaller seeds or chicken mash. They would eat amaranth or other smaller seeds. I’ll be saving seeds for them. I save amaranth and lambsquartes from wild plants. I use them for part of my winter sprouts. Popped amaranth seeds are tasty too. I’ll just gather more for the seramas2.
    Craigslist has free Pallets, free or low-cost items, estate sales and their discounted or free leftovers. Free things this week included 2 bicycles, a travel iron, baking pans, platters, a bag of clothing, a pickup load of premade drawers, about 100 sets of drawer glides, two small boxes of hinges and a drawer full of different kinds of pulls. There were 2 printers from one place and 2 computers from other sources. I’ve already given them away. There was a very large metal set of deep shelves that I did pay $25 for. It is now full of drawers and hardware. Freebies included much more. Even a couple of nice bow saws and an extra blade. I use most things. Some I give away. Some I’ll resell. Some will go into the church sale in September. There was a handful of old tools used by someone’s dad who was a welder. I’ll use them. I’m still looking for a vice.
    Old homes when cleaned out yield wonderful old kitchen and other tools. Families often don’t value those things. I do. I use them added to my heirlooms from Mom and Grandma. I put some in with camping items. I share with younger friends that are learning to appreciate those things. My two younger sons love those gifts. There was a nice tent this week. It went to my neighbor. They have a large tent but too many kids to fit in it. The smaller tent will hold the three older girls and give them more privacy.
    The treadle sewing machine cost me $100. I need to rebuild the bottom of one drawer and had to put the belt back on. Its missing the cover for the bobbin. I’ve made a cover that’s working ok… From an Arizona tea can. Mechanically it’s perfect..
    My backpacks were discounted at Wal-Mart after school started last year and the year before. I paid $2 and $5 for them all. New.
    Just saying, young or old, rich, middle class, or poor… You can be preparing to meet life. …if… Storms, wild fire, civil unrest… You can get what you need. Just watch for things that meet needs. It doesn’t have to say its for peppers. I watch for old hand tools for the shop and the kitchen. Many times folks buy specialy food prep tools and never use them. They are great for camping or your SHTF preps. I personally use great pgrandma’s handcrank meatgrinders and a flour grinder. I use a mandolin and whisks and gave away my electric tools except a mixer. When my arm heals I may decide differently about it. Last week I found an old salad shooter. I’d worn out mine years ago. This one looks almost new. Free. And 2 hand pasta rollers for $5. One lightly used goes to crafts. The new unused one goes to the kitchen while I learn to make pasta other than Mom’s thin rolled, wide cut egg noodles.

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    • The Ohio Prepper August 12, 14:50

      Clergylady,

      I depend on wood/pellets for my heat. The mobile home is just over 3 years old, purchased last year as a repo. It had propane forced air heat, water heater, and pipe for a stove connection. I bought a 250 gallon tank but before its hooked up I need a trench for the pipe. The gas company guy that does that shattered his arm and can’t run the trencher.

      That’s a shame, since owning your own tank makes for more fill options, for the best prices. We always call the local dealers and order from the lowest price provider. This year we paid only $0.959 (95.9 cents) per gallon plus sales tax, delivered. We have 4 tanks in the system holding a total of 2800-3150 gallons when filled to between 80-90%. Tanks cannot be filled to 100%, since they need some vapor space for the liquid propane to convert to gas. We purchased our tanks in steps as we could afford them with our 1st 1000 in 1999, 2nd 1000 in 2001, a 500 in 2016, and the final 1000 in 2017.
      This provides us with enough propane under normal operation for several years; but, in a SHTF scenario, we could save a bit of propane by heating with wood, and moving some of our cooking to the outdoors, also using wood, that is plentiful on the property.
      Once you’ve started using that 250 gallon tank you might want to evaluate adding another in the future. Based on your need and use.

      My neighbor started digging it with my tractors backhoe. About 6 ft into that it started leaking hydraulic fluid. He took the tractor up to his place to check it out. Its a dented filter that’s pouring out fluid. So I’ve had to wait till I could get a filter and a bucket of hydrolic fluid. Now we’re waiting till he has time to get to it.

      I find that you either pay a professional or when a neighbor can help, work on their schedule, so you end up paying with patience.

      It’s been so long since we had central heat or hot running water that we’re quite content without. I’ll fill the tank someday just for my cookstove and as winter backup. For now the stove is hooked up to a 5 gallon gas bottle.

      I haven’t lived without hot running water ever, except when roughing it camping somewhere or when the water heater was broken and being replaced for a few days. When we first moved here as a rental, we had no central heat, using only wood and electric in the bathroom; but, when we purchased it, the bank required s furnace, rhat was the start of our journey into propane.

      I dry the laundry on folding frames. One larger one is free standing or folds almost flat. The other two mount on interior doors and fold out as needed. Someday I may get outside clotheslines. One step at a time.

      We normally use the electric clothes dryer; but, if it dies, we’ll switch to propane; however, when the weather is right, we also use a fold up drying rack, that sounds like your description, and also the clothesline outside in summer. In a real pinch you can dry clothing outside in the winter, with the wet clothing first freezing and then the ice sublimating. We’ve done this a few times, just as an experiment and it does work if you were forced to do it.

      The garden is doing well but isn’t as large as I ultimately want. The tomatoes are blooming like crazy and starting to set like crazy. They were setting and blooming but just a few blooms at a time.

      Our garden is large; but, the past two springs have brought more than normal rain, and we’ve gotten late starts, so not as much yield as in the past. We’re going to layer in a lasagna garden this fall, so hopefully next year will be better.

      The green beans will be ready to pick in a few days. The red and yellow watermelons vines are running like crazy and blooming some. Same for the cucumber and I see some setting.

      Great for you; but, I’m just a bit jealous. LOL

      We ate the first yellow squashes yesterday with diced onion and a bit of browned hamburger. Seasoned lightly and a bit of real butter, it made a meal for two. We eat seasonally.

      Sounds good and hopefully the local farm market will have some things this week. We also usually eat seasonally; but, it’s good to have enough extra to preserve for later use and this year we a running short.

      Mostly I want folks to know they can live prepared to meet most disasters. I live on social security. We live frugally. I have to save up for every major purchase. We live carefully budgeting to save for things we need or want.

      I would agree. We also live on SS times 2 plus a small pension and monthly distributions from two IRA’s. I can take larger distributions from another IRA for larger, planned purchases when needed, so we are actually rather well off, all things considered; but, for a good reason.
      I worked for more than 40 years as an engineer making good money; but, lived a frugal lifestyle, mostly driving pre owned vehicles until they were turned in at the junk yard. I saved to the 401K and other plans regularly, and learned to do most maintenance on vehicles and the property. When I needed a new hot water tank some years ago, I did all of the plumbing myself, including the chimney & propane connections, and saved a ton of cash, purchasing only the tank and some fittings.
      I bought my first house @ age 25, renovated it and sold it, with the proceeds paying off this property more than 20 years ago.
      I see too many people strapped with debt due to house hopping and car hopping, not content to stay in one place or drive one car until it dies, or being impatient and not saving for a large purchase, when they can use the credit card and make horrible payments. We use a credit card heavily; but, pay the balance, every month, no matter what it is, since all major purchases are planned and scheduled.
      Once again, it takes patience.

      I take advantage of Craigslist and often drive an hour each way to get a pickup full of things we want and need.

      Unfortunately, most items on Craig’s list around here are old junk, with people asking new prices, or free items you would not want in your house.
      A free item might be a couch, sitting in the alley behind a house, where you can just pick it up. Who knows what animal waste or how much rain (mold & mildew) has befallen such an term.

      My regular chickens are mostly free range and forrage food all day long. They show up for some grain every morning. The serama eat smaller seeds or chicken mash. They would eat amaranth or other smaller seeds.

      Ours are Rocks with a mix of Barred & White; but, your little Serama sounds interesting and perhaps worth looking into. When ours are not molting, which they are right now, we get more eggs than we can eat and gift or trade them with neighbors.

      I’ll be saving seeds for them. I save amaranth and lambsquartes from wild plants. I use them for part of my winter sprouts. Popped amaranth seeds are tasty too. I’ll just gather more for the seramas2.

      We feed clover and some greens for a treat as well as scratch, freeze dried meal worms that they love; plus, insects and worms they find in their paddock area.

      The treadle sewing machine cost me $100. I need to rebuild the bottom of one drawer and had to put the belt back on. Its missing the cover for the bobbin. I’ve made a cover that’s working ok… From an Arizona tea can. Mechanically it’s perfect..

      The wife inherited the treadle machine from her mom, already converted with a motor, so I’m still looking for treadle pieces to convert it back; however, around here they are considered antiques and are much too expensive.

      Just saying, young or old, rich, middle class, or poor… You can be preparing to meet life. …if… Storms, wild fire, civil unrest… You can get what you need. Just watch for things that meet needs. It doesn’t have to say its for peppers.

      In our rural neighborhood everyone is a prepper; but, most would not use that label. We are sitting rather pretty, with a 3000 ft2 home with all new windows & doors and foam insulation, 5 outbuildings, a propane tank farm with enough propane to run us for years in austerity mode, supplementing with wood heat, from our wood lot, and a whole house auto start generator, fueled from those tanks. I could go on & on; but, my whole point here is that all of this stuff and our situation took more than half of our lives, living in one place, planning and being frugal and careful with our expenditures. People who hurry through life and want it all now, often hit that debt cliff, where the SHTF moment could be as simple as an extended job loss or illness.

      I personally use great pgrandma’s handcrank meatgrinders and a flour grinder. I use a mandolin and whisks and gave away my electric tools except a mixer.

      We still use electric tools to save time; but, still have functional manual tools and occasionally check them and use them, lest they fail when really needed.

      Reply to this comment
  14. Clergylady August 12, 22:15

    I agree about staying in one place and living frugal. I’ve lived in this little unincorporated village since 1977 and owned the 3 acres here without mortgage since 1981. We drilled 2 wells. One at a time of course. Paying for everything as we went.
    My current mobile home is just 4 years old and the new regulations are more stringent than for a conventional stick built home. No more particleboard floors that turn to mush if they get wet. 🙂 I bought it as a 3 year old repo.
    Friends and I tore down the 1974 singlewide that stood in this spot. Then moved in the home as soon as the spot was cleaned up. We’d camped for a year in another old mobile home officially designated as storage. My solar array is in place and hooked up but I’m waiting for the home to be grounded and we can turn on the power. It’s paid for also. We’ve camped in here with cold running water and the heating stove while work had been done and room by room has been painted and while I recovered from injuries and 2 surgeries. I’m beginning to work on things again so trying to get things arranged and sorted out and settled in. I hate moving! Hopefully never again.
    I have a 1912 Vulcan propane cookstove next to the wood/ pellet stove. They sit on solid cement blocks set on cement board that also extends up the wall and is covered with dry layed used bricks. My lamps, candles, glass and ceramic insulators and antique kitchen items sit on and in it. That’s the focal point of the room that is kitchen, dinning and living room. There is a tiny laundry room at the back door, a 12’x16′ bedroom and a 4’x16′ bathroom across the end wall. It opens to the bedroom with a 4′ wide opening without doors. Toilet in tiny area with a door. Shower across the other end is build with 2 seats and sliding glass doors. In between in a linnen cabinet, the sink cabinet with drawers and doors under the one sink then a large space to the shower. I set a 1930s waterfall dresser there with the shower mat in front of it. That gives us more storage.
    I have the hardware kit for a 12′ barn door set that will eventually close the bathroom off as we choose to. Mostly for visitors comfort and privacy.
    I have a sturdy metal folding cot that is more than 100 years old. I put a twin mattress on it and made it up in a corner with lots of pillows rather like a daybed. Under it I have storage bins out of sight and the ottoman is a folding twin bed (with an air mattress to make it more comfortable) if we have company. Mostly it is my husbands daughter and her two granddaughters that come to visit. Most of my kids live about an hour away. I tease my husband “in this home kids won’t be moving home to live with us”. I need to pick up one more twin air matress and blanket as the girls are getting too big to share a twin bed now. Those go in a bin under the bed. Pillows for all the beds are in pretty pillowcases on the bed as part of the throw pillows.
    Were hoping to find a sponsor for my daughter in law and grand daughter to come from the Philippines. A son who is on disability is currently living there. He had fixed up my parents little home for his family.
    Most of my Craigslist things come from high end neighborhoods or weekend estate sales. I drive a long way to pastor a country church and home through Albuquerque. I go to pick up things or shop the estate sales on Sunday afternoons. I only go shopping sales on Dr visit days in between. Sundays are the end of most estate sales and leftovers are donated. By afternoon they are deeply discounted.
    Sometimes in free things or materials I’ll find things I want and pick then up on Sunday if they don’t mind holding them for me.
    This last week I did make a trip to get a cabinet shops leftover premade drawers, 100 sets of drawer glides, 2 boxes of hinges for cabinet doors, a large drawer filled we both handles and drawer pulls and a narrow cabinet of other hardware. I bought a 4’x 30″ metal shelves 5′ tall. The shelves and floor under the shelves are now filled from the cabinet shop things. Cabinet shop items – free. Heavy Metal shelves $25. That was worth a couple of hours on the road.
    Yesterday on the way home I picked up two tall cabinets. One I’ll paint and put in the laundry room. The other is painted and nice but its going to the shop. Then I went by a home the family is cleaning up. It was the parents home. I bought a few things already but they asked me to come back. They had boxes for me and what I don’t keep will go in the church sale. I’ll see what’s there when I get the truck unloaded. I pd $15 for a loveseat size metal glider with wood seat and back, a small metal and glass table, and two heavy plastic chairs. I’ll paint the metal cream and the wood aqua to match my metal and aqua heavy folding picknick table. They will look nice in the yard. I also picked up a wood mail sorter from a school office- free.
    Spray paint and plastic sheeting and tape left from painting my home inside will be a cheap project and unify the yard items by color. I could go more turquoise and be brighter but still in related shades of blue. I’ll choose when I go buy Spray paint.
    Just over a week ago I bought a $10 sewing machine in a nice wood stand. I spent 12 minutes on cleaning and oil. Had it running perfectly. Bought a package of needles and checked timing. Broke the first needle. Worked on timing and adjusted the motor outward a bit to increase tension on the belt. Perfect!. Less than 20 minutes and $15 total. I gave it to a friend who is raising all her grand children from age 2 months up to 16 years. Her machine broke and is unrepairable.
    At one stop last week the lady gave me a lot of her gardening stuff. She was getting ready to move. I ended up with with one of those seldom if ever used little seats on wheels with and empty area for small hand tools. I probably won’t sit on it but tools in it by the garden could be handy. The leftover seeds should be ok for several years. I’ll add them to mine. I’m always pleasantly surprised when free things are added to what I buy or get free.
    The serama chickens were promised but weren’t kept. So I didn’t get them. Guess I’ll start watching for the little French quail that are gaining popularity here. Hens are better breeders than the serama chickens. They lay eggs very young. And one adult is a small serving or two for a larger serving. I’d like them for eggs. They take cage layers just 8″ – 10″ tall. Need to be kept inside. Eat small seeds. Amaranth and Lambsquarters would be just right. I like them for food grains so I’m thinking I’ll order seed for amaranth that makes the bigger seed heads. First enough for us and if I get small birds I will grow for them as well. Volunteer alfalfa grows in a corner of the property. The chickens, ducks, and rabbits all love it. I gather growing tips for tea or to add to my green drink from the blender. There is usually some Mullen there also.
    The 2 bikes I was given last week just need flat tires repaired and a chain guard would be nice. I’ll see if my husband can still ride before I make a final decision on what to do with them. I still enjoy riding.
    The 6, 5 gallon cans we keep diesel in came from free stuff on Craigslist. I picked up 2 rabbit cages, and went home with the cans, an air hose and a bunch of 2x4s. I like Craigslist. 🙂 it makes it possible to get lots of free or cheap items I need and use. Our health and life insurances cost us about 1/4 of our social security income.
    Not complaining. Not paying out interest or mortgage payments is a life saver.

    Reply to this comment
  15. Clergylady August 14, 05:43

    I have a blood pressure cuff and 2 thermometers. A way to measure oxygen is a great idea.

    Reply to this comment
  16. Clergylady August 14, 21:36

    Ill have to look for a couple. I’d imagine a pharmacy would carry them.

    Reply to this comment
  17. Yosemite August 15, 01:14

    In the pantry and Hurricane Box or whatever name you want to give it.
    I do have canned meats such as Roast Beef and Gravy. BBQ Pulled Pork Chicken Turkey Tuna Corned Beef, sardines smoked herring. Assorted other canned good soups Sauces Ramen and other type assorted pasta spaghetti, linguine, shells….etc. are kept in the freezer to keep bugs out but can easily removed. Lots of rice including yellow rice, various packages of Instant mashed potatoes and various pasta dinners. Various canned veggies from asparagus to carrots green peas to green beans etc. Both Beef and Chicken broth Vienna Sausages and some boxes of saltines and Waverly Wafers. Peanut butter Strawberry and other Jams. Coffee and tea an assorted creamers.
    A few bags of Hard candy from Butterscotch to others.
    Large box and I got most of tt a few items at a time
    Most of the canned meats come from a Dollar type store. A couple of can openers but most are pop tops these days. A couple decks of cards and some puzzle books and pencil and several of those small pencil sharpeners and travel games. Little things to break the boredom.
    An emergency AM/FM/Weather hand cranked radio

    Assorted canned snacks candles assorted batteries and some lamp oil. Strike anywhere matches and Bic lighters.

    Knives and forks and spoons paper plates cups .Spices honey and a bunch of other food and drink related items. I also have some other long term items to eat.

    A couple those safely drink water straws. I have free flowing well and a swimming poo to get water from.
    and most important……Toilet paper and a real Military
    E Tool a folding shovel. and other things.

    I do have a checklist and do rotate items in and out regularly/ as needed..Again it comes from catching items on sale and buying a few here and there and eventually adds up……There s no true one Hurricane Box.. Mine is actually several boxes and I prefer to use large coolers as the boxes.

    Reply to this comment
    • Clergylady August 18, 08:21

      Red.
      Good to see you’re back home. Glad the garden survived while you were gone. Of all my vet kids all but one use the VA for medical care. Just one has expensive insurance and prefers that. I think it’s his wife’s influence. The rest seem to get good care. When my younger son reacted to a new med and stopped breathing while in route to the hospital he was taken to the leading trauma center instead of the VA. The VA has paid the bill.
      We had a big pan of amaranth greens with dinner tonight. I cut up some chicken breast and lightly browned it in a frying pan then added 2 diced yellow squash and half a diced onion. Added herbs and a bit of salt then covered it to steam the veggies. In the big skillet I diced 4 slices of bacon and browned that. Set aside the meat and added a big bowl full of washed amaranth leaves. Added 1/2 cup water, 3/4 teaspoon of salt, 1/4 teaspoon black pepper, 1/2 teaspoon Mrs dash herbs, and 1 tablespoon of real butter. Cover and let steam. Turn the greens a few times with tongs. Then cut up with two knives. Add 3 tablespoons of cider vinegar and leave lid off to cook off liquid. Simple meal. Husband hates greens but ate almost half of what I cooked. It was equal to nearly two cans of spinach in volumn when cooked. Then he also ate half of the chicken and yellow squash. He really surprised me eating that much of the amaranth.
      I have two distinct kinds growing wild here. One has a white pattern on the green leaves. My favorite has larger leaves and is plane green. It is the more tender of the two. It’s also the better one in salads.
      I was checking the tomato plants just before dark this evening. There are dozens of fruits setting. Usually we don’t get many and they are ripening just as winter is starting. This year many plants didn’t survive the long wait until it was arm enough at night to plant. Those that made it into the garden are bearing better than I’ve ever seen tomatoes do here. The first two cucumbers are three inches long and more are setting. It was so late I was afraid we wouldn’t have much garden. Ears are showing silk on the corn. It was getting so late I started plants and transplanted. Every plant made it. I pulled my first radishes this evening. They will go in a big salad tomorrow evening.
      I have three stops on the way home tomorrow. 2 for Craigslist item and the other started out as. Raiglist sales but they keep giving boxes of good item for me to keep or put in the church sale in September. I think tomorrow it will be Christmas things including a small train set. My husband loves trains and Christmas.

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