When Grocery Stores Go Empty – A Back Door Shopping Strategy

Ryan Dotson
By Ryan Dotson September 4, 2017 10:12

When Grocery Stores Go Empty – A Back Door Shopping Strategy

As a prepper or survivalist, we all typically pride ourselves on being prepared for SHTF situations.  At any given time we usually have a good amount of non-perishable foods stored, as well as options for hunting, fishing, trapping, and gardening.  However, not everybody is quite this prepared for a worst case scenario.  Despite our best efforts, many of us will be forced to join the masses and head to the grocery store to stock up for the days or weeks to come.  If that happens, this is your guide to surviving the ordeal and coming out with a good amount of needed nutrition.

How to Avoid the Grocery Store

Before we delve into the chaos of the grocery store, I must emphasize how much more effective it can be to avoid the store completely.  If you have the means by which to stock up on dry and canned goods in advance, please do it.  In addition, my family always has woods for hunting, a pond for fishing, a garden for vegetables, fruit trees for peaches and apples, and even a trap line.  We have grape vines, wild edibles, mulberry trees, and blackberry bushes.  We can vegetables and meat, make jerky, keep hard tack, make pemmican, and keep homemade granola on hand.  If we were to lose the power grid, we would still have food for months if not years.  This is the ideal setup to avoid the grocery store when SHTF.

What to Expect at the Store

Have you ever been shopping on Black Friday?  Imagine that, but add in the variable that everybody is fighting for their lives.  Yes, it will be that insane.  Initially people will assume that power will be restored within a few days, so perishable versus non-perishable will not be a huge factor.  Milk, eggs, bread, butter, meat, produce, and premade meals will go first.  These aisles will either be picked over or will be a war zone, so you are best to avoid them completely. Batteries, alcohol, cigarettes, and toilet paper will also go fast.  After 72 hours, people will start to realize that this problem could be long term.  At this point there will be a larger focus on canned goods and dried goods.  In order to come home with anything of value, you need to have a strategy going into the store.

Related: How To Get The Best Value For Your Items After SHTF

Phase 1

When you make your first pass through the store, you should be trying to target the high value items that other people may be overlooking.  We are assuming that you are shopping on day one of the panic, so you will have some opportunity.   Your first sweep should be focused on non-perishable items.  This includes rice, pasta, beans, powdered milk, juice, powdered eggs, jerky, boxed meals, canned goods, pickled items, dried fruit, nuts, popcorn, cereal, crackers, or anything else which does not have to be refrigerated or frozen.  Also look for any toiletry items that may be overlooked.  Everybody will go for toilet paper, but items like deodorant, toothpaste, soap, shampoo, razors, and shaving cream can make life much easier for you and your family.  Many people will be thinking short term like they might think during a major snow storm.   They cannot comprehend that the disaster could last weeks or even months.  Take advantage of their naivety.

Phase 2

After collecting as many of the neglected high value items as you can, you can move on to the items that almost everybody forgets.  At this point you will be in aisles that are largely devoid of people. Hit the baking aisle for flour, oats, sugar, oil, and spices.  You can make all kinds of different foods with these ingredients.  Go after disposable items such as cups, paper plates, silverware, and paper towels.  With limited water for cleaning dishes, these items can really help.  Pick up cleaning supplies for the kitchen, bathroom, and laundry.  Get medical supplies such as aspirin, bandages, Benadryl, antacid, prescriptions, rubbing alcohol, iodine, chap stick, and petroleum jelly.  Raid the vitamin aisle for multivitamins, protein shakes, energy bars, and supplements. Pick up some chocolate bars for an occasional treat and for bartering with other people.

It may sound weird, but get some wet and dry dog food as a last resort for nutrition.  It is certainly better than nothing if your other food runs out, and you can use it as bait for trapping as well.  There is probably a random aisle that may have charcoal, flashlights, candles, cordage, superglue, and air freshener. Even books or magazines are a good idea to keep everybody sane during your disaster.  All of these are items that are normally left on the shelf when people are panicking about survival.  Go after these items before you leave.  You do not want to make more than one trip to this mad house.

Related: 24 Prepping Items I Don’t Spend Money On

General Caution

Before you enter the store, be realistic about what you are going to face.  There will be fights over a gallon of milk.  People will be trampled.  Someone may even open fire to clear out an aisle.  This is a very dangerous scenario.  As you move through the store, be the grey man.  Blend in and do not bring attention to yourself.  Move quickly, but do not run.  If there is conflict in one area of the store, move to another.  Avoid paying with cash if possible so nobody is tempted to try and rob you.  Bring a way to defend yourself, but do not pull it out unless you have no other choice.  Working through this store will be a bit like escaping from a riot.  With some caution and a little luck, you will get the items you need and get out fine.

While none of us want to think about being forced into this scenario, inevitably it will happen to some people.  The key is organization and preparation.  Do not run into the store and go nuts like everybody else.  Be methodical about the items you target.  If you go after the items that others forget, you will get more of what you need will very little chance of conflict.  Follow this strategy, and your pantry will be stocked to last through the end of your SHTF scenario.

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Ryan Dotson
By Ryan Dotson September 4, 2017 10:12
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46 Comments

  1. Amazmerizing September 4, 16:37

    Good points here. I especially liked the part where you said how most would see it as though it were like the times surrounding a major storm. So true. And I see it all the time online in forums and groups. Thats exactly the mindset. BTW I laughed at air freshener. Namaste. 😉

    Reply to this comment
  2. AK Johnny 1 September 4, 16:51

    The scenario outlayed above, BELIEVE ME, is very realistic and as close to on-point as it gets.
    I’ve prepped for 7 hurricanes in Florida, 4 were direct hits.
    That said, After Hurricane Wilma in October, 2005, ALL power in West Palm Beach was gone. 3 days post-storm, a Publix grocery store down the street from us hired a tractor-trailer sized generator to re-open the store. Mind you, it was the ONLY store for literally miles around that had opened, and THANK GOD law enforcement was there, a LOT of em.
    Anyway, OUR power came back on in 3 days as we were on the same grid as Wellington Hospital, which receives priority for re-establishing power, and I went to the Publix to pick up some items. I shopped through a MOB of edgy folks, got what I needed, which included FROZEN items, and went to the checkout line. My turn came up, and as i’m placing my items on the conveyor, INCLUDING THE FROZEN ITEMS, the lady behind me goes nuts! “He has power!” She yells….. She points at my frozen items, and screams it loudly AGAIN…. “HE’s got power!” and I turn around to size her up. I reply kind of testily, “SO?”
    “It’s not fair!” She loudly wails, and begins to rant to everyone around her, about what a turd I am because I have air conditioning, a working refrigerator, blah blah, while the “REST” of us are suffering! What right do I HAVE to power that no one else has? “THIS MAN thinks he’s BETTER than you, he thinks we’re chumps, yada yada…
    Now, the frustrated, scared folks around her are beginning to RESPOND to the rant, chime in, and begin eyeing me like a was a child rapist or something! The crowd started getting ugly, and right on the VERGE of them moving in on me, 2 sheriff’s deputies showed up, told the lady AND the recently-hostile crowd, to knock it off or they would be THROWN out. They reiterated it 3 times because the ruckus got so loud….
    I payed for my stuff quickly, shot out into the parking lot, threw my stuff in the van and got out of there in a real hurry. All this because I put FROZEN items on the conveyor where desperate people could SEE it…
    THIS people… THIS is how quickly AND HOW EASILY a riot or significant fight can break out when emergency stress is thrust on people. Over frozen food…
    Now, every time there is even a THREAT of a hurricane making landfall within a 200 mile radius of us, I go to the store, middle of the night if I have to, (Walmart) and get everything we’d conceivably need BEFORE the storm causes a panic.
    The biggest danger I feel, is NOT the natural disaster inflicted upon you…. It’s the CRAZY DESPERATE, IRRATIONAL PEOPLE both pre, AND post-storm that pose the biggest threat.
    Heed this advice, and stay AHEAD of the prep curve….

    Reply to this comment
    • JoEllen September 4, 17:24

      Another thing to consider is that if your grocery store has no power their doors will be locked because their computerized registers require power in order to sell their merchandise…

      Reply to this comment
      • AK Johnny 1 September 4, 23:55

        Right! It’s great that Publix had the temerity to bring in a truck-sized generator! I wish MORE stores did this all along America’s coastline. The one disadvantage of these? The companies that own these monster generators charge upwards of $75,000 A WEEK to rent these! And this was back in 2005….Which makes them price-prohibitive AND condition-prohibitive. Meaning, if you invest the money for a week rental on these, if the power comes back on after 4 days, you STILL owe the balance! Nice huh? lol

        Reply to this comment
    • Regina67 September 7, 19:20

      Wow – that was awesome information, Johnny – thank you for sharing that story with us! We went through the four big ones in 2004 with Hurricane Charlie and Jeanne being our worst. Your story about the frozen items is something I would never have expected, but now I know to be aware. Thank you!

      Reply to this comment
    • SmalltownRoger September 9, 21:04

      Next time, gun with you. a big one.

      I myself would have said, “no, I have a smoker… hickory chips. I’m thawing this, cutting it into strips, smoking it so it won’t go putrid. THAT makes me LUCKY. “

      Reply to this comment
    • vocalpatriot September 24, 16:21

      AK Johnny 1, Admittedly, I don’t know, but your Publix story reeks of bullshit.
      I had a very similar experience in the winter of ’05 in Ma.
      Lots of snow knocked out power to a large portion of southeastern Ma., including the part of Cape Cod that I lived in. Several days with no power did NOT freak people out. We drove around to the homes of elderly and young families with small children to make sure they all had what they needed, and met LOTS of other folks doing exactly the same thing.
      So, if you want to spin your tale, then at least either keep it believable or begin with “once upon a time..”

      Reply to this comment
  3. left coast chuck September 4, 17:00

    I was in the grocery store Friday and saw chicken jerky for dogs that looked pretty attractive. I don’t know the difference between jerky for dogs (4-legged) and jerky for people. I didn’t look at the ingredients but I suppose jerky for dogs has “meat by-products” in it, but then I read that hamburger has been augmented with stuff they sweep up of the slaughterhouse floor,.

    I don’t know if it was an urban legend or not, but I do remember reading that all pet foods are inspected by the USDA whereas human products such as Dinty Moore beef stew are not. Don’t remember the source of that and can’t make any statement either confirming or denying.

    Reply to this comment
    • JoEllen September 4, 17:20

      The USDA meat inspectors have to work so rapidly that about all they can do is eyeball the meat as it goes by them on a conveyor. It insures nothing! Pet jerky often times has stuff in it that will sicken your pet much less you if you try to eat it. I remember awhile back when it was coming from China and contained plastics. Moral of the story for me is to avoid that and buy more beans and grains!

      Reply to this comment
      • left coast chuck September 4, 19:30

        Good points. I had forgotten about the Chinese connection and pet food. I try very hard to avoid anything that goes in or on my body made by our close allies and good friends, the Chinese.

        I would add to my post had I actually gotten further than just eyeballing the stuff I would have checked to see what “other products” were listed and if they were just “other products” I would have passed. I’m not hungry enough yet to be scarfing down mystery food.

        Speaking of items manufactured by our good friends and close allies, some items that are manufactured in “other places” the label will say “Manufactured in various locations under the supervision of XYZ Company headquartered in City and State, USA. ”

        That is a tip-off that the stuff is manufactured off shore. If it is a product that some medical professional has recommended, I will call the 800 number listed to get information on just where “various locations” are. Many times they include locations in our closest ally, China. It is one way major corporations continue to watch out for our well-being. They don’t want us worrying needlessly about products manufactured in China, so they use euphemisms so that we don’t worry needlessly — oh, and, of course, buy their products thinking they were manufactured here in the U.S.

        Reply to this comment
    • West Coast September 4, 19:52

      The thought about pet food is a good one in some cases. There is a dog biscuit company in Washington state that a friend worked at. She even munched on the biscuits herself because she knew what quality ingredients went into them.
      The negative side is that I just read a pet food cookbook that pointed out that some of the largest pet food companies use all sorts of animals for creating their “food”. That includes roadkill, dead animals past freshness and…euthanized pets that sometimes even had their flea collars left on. So gross…

      Reply to this comment
    • Kimmy September 5, 03:22

      Most dogs food have animal by products which include dead dogs….and other animals. Don’t EVER eat dig food as most pay off the FAD anyhow.

      Reply to this comment
    • Lee September 5, 12:59

      alot of the difference is SANITATION during manufacture. the same with animal meds. they can be used by humans but know what you are doing. EMERGENCY ONLY.

      Reply to this comment
    • d September 13, 04:37

      Just a note about dog jerky. Our dog recently became pretty sick and found out it was salmonella from the dog jerky. The vet said to never buy that stuff. She sees it all the time. Just wanted to share that in case you wanted to know.

      Reply to this comment
  4. JoEllen September 4, 17:14

    Very thoughtful and insightful article! Saving your article. for planning ahead. Seems to me it is best to prep in advance so you are not held hostage by a need to shop when SHTF. That’s my plan! I think some of your tips are useful for regular shopping trips as well. Thanks.

    Reply to this comment
  5. All ready prepared!! September 4, 17:29

    I’ve been planing for years the store is not where a person should be when anything hits.Period!!

    Reply to this comment
    • JoEllen September 4, 18:02

      It is really peaceful not to feel compelled to go to the grocery store for an impending weather crisis to “stock up” isn’t it!

      Reply to this comment
  6. Wannabe September 4, 18:11

    Friends, us in Texas are living this right now. This disaster has confirmed and strengthened the belief in prepping a hundred fold. Prepare before it happens. So many without basic survival needs as we discuss with these articles. Making trips daily since last Monday to heavily flooded areas where people have NOTHING. I know floods will destroy the stockpiled items we work on but having something as little as a bug out bag and a bug out location is weeks ahead for survival which is more than what about ninety percent of all victims even think about. Keep prepping my friends, don’t slack off and don’t give in to criticism. And to our friends in Florida, watch Irma, it might come your way. East coast, watch Irma it might be coming your way. Southern coast watch Irma it might be coming our way. If you have need of food and water go now and get them because when it looks like it will be coming your way it is almost too late because EVERYBODY will be hitting the stores and the above article addresses those problems. God bless, stay safe, pray for America and keep prepping.

    Reply to this comment
  7. Left coast chuck September 4, 19:19

    Just because a bucket is under water doesn’t necessarily mean that the contents are spoiled. If the seal is adequate, the contents should be safe. I would wipe down the outside of the bucket around the lid before I opened it and use bleach if I had it to sanitize the outside before opening. Even if you have just dumped rice into a 5-gal. bucket and closed the lid, it should still be good to eat if, when you open the lid the rice is dry and the flood waters have not gotten inside.

    I intend to boil my stored water anyway as part of my paranoia about tainted water. So if you have drums of water stored, it too should be safe but because you can’t visually tell if bad water has gotten into good, AND because your water purity assurance lab is probably under water too, I would recommend boiling any drinking water after it has been submerged by flood waters.

    How are you going to get dry wood or charcoal for the fires necessary to boil the water you might ask. Easy, Little Cricket. Store charcoal in screw-on lid 5 gal. buckets like you do the rice you are going to boil.

    I buy milk in 1-gal. plastic containers. They aren’t any good for storing liquids once the milk is consumed. BUT, they are perfectly good for storing pieces of dried wood for use in my rocket stove to boil the water to cook the rice etc. etc. The lids screw down tight and keep the wood inside dry so that it will burn readily. The small rocket stove puts out just about maximum from the wood and only needs a small amount of wood to put out that heat. Any time I trim a tree or a bush on my property that wood gets dried, cut up and stored in a gallon milk container. Best of all, they can be stored outside, in just about any kind of container or just covered with a plastic tarp if you are concerned about opsec or the neighbors complaining about all the milk bottles in your yard.

    Reply to this comment
  8. West Coast September 4, 20:01

    Dear Wannabe, You shared great words of advice. Texas and Louisiana have such quality people with integrity to go out and help your neighbors. The videos those of us who live farther north have seen of your courage has brought tears to our eyes.
    What Texas has given to the rest of the nation is a clear picture of how to act during a terrible time and what works and doesn’t work during a deluge of water.

    Reply to this comment
  9. West Coast September 4, 20:06

    Left Coast, I have started to keep my containers that held liquid laundry detergent to store water for non-food purposes, such as washing. The containers have large caps that are easy to twist off and tolerate being bumped around quite a bit. They also have built-in pour spouts.

    Reply to this comment
    • left coast chuck September 4, 20:52

      Good idea. Plus they already have residual soap in them that will aid in washing. I used to use 1 gal. Clorox btls. but they are not 1-gal any more and take up the same space.
      1-gal. white vinegar btls. are okay for storing salt.

      What is happening in Texas and Louisiana with folks helping out is the way it should be done. Thank you all for your public-spirited assistance in a time of need.

      Reply to this comment
  10. Greyhawke September 5, 01:24

    Great message to get out.

    Reply to this comment
  11. Ellen September 5, 06:11

    To keep most of my storage foods dry I use a food saver.
    Things such as powdered milk are in glass containers with the lid on tight. The beans, rice, millet, lentils, oats,
    jello, candy, nuts, dried fruits, vegetables and meat, cheese, butter etc. are in either glass, shrunk wrapped or metal cans. I know the metal cans will rust when exposed to moisture.

    Reply to this comment
  12. Illini Warrior September 5, 15:48

    A woman was just attacked over back to school supplies – her mother had to rescue her by drawing her concealed weapon … 10X for crazy SHTF buying and near looting/rioting conditions

    Don’t shop solo – 3 man team – shopper/bodyguard/vehicle and parking lot backup guard ….

    One cart buys at a time – escort it safely to the vehicle for safe keeping – FULL communication with buying team at all times – watch for riot mob arrival …

    Reply to this comment
    • left coast chuck September 5, 16:52

      I had a similar thought when reading this article. An armed team is safer than an individual, even if that individual is armed. A team can provide multi-directional defense whereas an individual is limited in the area he can cover. I like the idea of a non-lethal defense against unarmed hostile shoppers, only shocking devices are appropriate unless one wants to clear out a large area, and be forced to leave themselves. I know from first hand experience, even the smallest amount of pepper spray will cause an enclosed area to become uninhabitable. So, if you are being pursued by a crowd as you are leaving, pepper spray would certainly be an appropriate response. If you plan to continue “shopping” a taser or stun gun would be a more appropriate response or a simple club applied to a knee or shoulder.

      Reply to this comment
      • JoEllen September 5, 18:15

        Sounds reasonable. You suggest pepper spray–where can one buy this?

        Reply to this comment
        • left coast chuck September 6, 03:10

          On line one can buy pepper spray from Midwayusa.com, Cabelas.com, Basspro.com, Natchesshootingsports.com, Brownells.com and many other shooting sports on line marketers. Locally, you can buy it at most gun stores and a lot of sporting goods stores. There are some states where it is illegal to own. I’m sorry, I don’t have a list of those ComBloc states. If there is a gun store or a small sporting goods store, check with them to see if you can own it in your state.

          I personally like the Kimber pepper spray device. It is only two shots because unlike an aerosol dispenser, it dispenses under pressure. I suspect they use a small CO2 canister such as one uses in a CO2 gun or a seltzer water dispenser. It advises not to use it if your assailant is closer than ten feet (or some such distance) Well, if I feel I need to use pepper spray to protect myself, I probably am not going to have time to whip out my tape measure and desist if you are 9.5 feet from me. Oops, you were 8 feet away. Dang! Sorry about that.

          Kimber has two models. One is shaped like a small red pistol with a grip sufficient for two fingers. The other is black with a pocket clip and is oblong in shape. I prefer the black model but no one seems to be carrying it these days. Some people like that it looks like a gun; some prefer one that does not looks so much like a gun. I am in the latter group. Just personal preference.

          Reply to this comment
  13. Mic Roland September 5, 20:21

    It’s interesting that this article describes almost exactly what I had the characters in my books did. They decided to make a final grocery run on a store they knew would be mobbed by hordes of the ill-prepared trying suddenly prepare for a grid-down lifestyle.
    — They did up lists of what to get, aimed at augmenting their existing stores.
    –They had alternate items in case the primary ones were sold out.
    — They focused on staples rather than “easy” foods which would be sought first by the panicking unprepared.
    — They split up to get to targeted items more quickly.
    — They brought cash, expecting that credit/debit would not work.

    In the book (book 2), there was a dollar limit set by the store. That may or may not happen. The store could impose quantity limits (2 cases of water per person), or prices could be jacked up to where cash-available becomes the limitation.

    It’s sound advice to have targeted lists and alternates to avoid panic-grabbing.

    — Mic

    Reply to this comment
  14. Rick Fortune September 5, 21:32

    I try to be polite, and I’d probably share with friends and family in a SHTF situation. But the article is just goofy. You don’t need paper goods, wash the dishes. You don’t need deodorant, just wash up! You don’t need candles, they are just a fire hazard. The intent was good, but REAL preparedness requires much more thought. I’d happily critique anyone’s preps, and I don’t consider myself an expert, but I do know better than most people.

    Reply to this comment
    • JoEllen September 5, 21:57

      Perhaps you don’t need paper goods but its a good trade off to conserve your supply of stored water–however much you have! I personally don’t like candles so I have camp lanterns and kerosene lamps instead. I think all types of lighting has limitations but I wouldn’t rule out any of them. I think your dish washing only works if you have an ongoing supply of water. Deodorant is a necessity IMO.

      Reply to this comment
    • Wannabe September 7, 13:36

      Hey rick, south Texas does not have running water in many areas, they can’t wash up. We have delivered countless pallets of wipes, toilet paper, paper plates, plastic ware, disposable cups, napkins and anything else to keep as sanitary as possible because they CANT take a shower. All rivers and ponds are contaminated. And yes we have delivered deodorant as well. So I hate to burst your bubble but you don’t know more about prepping than most. Just go look those people in the eye and say you don’t need paper plates just wash the dishes. Hell most of them don’t even have a home to wash dishes in or a dish for that matter it got destroyed in the flood. Well anyway before I say something I regret you better think befor you say something as stupid as I just read in your comment.

      Reply to this comment
    • Wannabe September 8, 01:52

      No response rick fortune? I’m waiting.

      Reply to this comment
  15. Hue September 5, 22:10

    I agree. I do long-term storage of all the different grains beans Rice’s Etc. the one item that is truly in disposable is canned vegetables such as peas carrots etc which I also rotate. I know many will ask why because they are not very high in calories but one thing each of those cans contains that nobody really thinks of is 1/2 to 1 cup of water per can. That is also potable water and can be drank right from the can.

    Reply to this comment
  16. vocalpatriot September 6, 01:34

    “..open fire to clear an aisle..” ???
    Really? When it gets that bad it will be called looting.
    If things even get close to this scenario, it will already be too late to “shop”..Run away, then lock and load. And rotate a guard duty at home.

    Reply to this comment
    • JoEllen September 6, 01:48

      I’m retired and I don’t remember ever having my current level of concern about where society is heading. There is so much unrest and hatred. To me if feels like we are careening down the path of no return. These scenarios of rudeness in the grocery store are an everyday occurrence on a smaller scale and I can see how it could easily escalate to tragic consequences. Its stressful to contemplate people behaving like animals in a crisis.
      .

      Reply to this comment
      • Left coast chuck September 6, 03:27

        I agree, JoEllen. Who in the world pulls a gun over a notebook for school? What kind of people even get in an argument over something like a school notebook? What are we talking about? A 49¢ item? A $3.99 item?

        If I had a lake less than a block from my house as I did when I was very young, or if I had a stream close to my property, I would not consider paper plates and cups. I might not even worry about deodorant. In SoCal, fresh water is a scarce commodity and water is going to be at a real premium. I intend to use ocean water for a lot of purposes, but I still have to haul it at least five miles one way if I can use the most direct route to it. The closest reliable fresh water is twenty miles away one way. Paper products are going to be a life saver, especially if there is wide-spread civil unrest. I

        f there is civil unrest, you don’t want your house lit up like some Christmas decoration competition entry. You will want just enough light to navigate by. You will want to use red lenses on your lighting equipment. Above all, you will want to preserve your night vision. Turn off your bright illumination that has drawn marauders like moths to a porch light and you will be unable to see for several minutes. The brighter the illumination, the longer it will be for your night vision to return. For every flashlight with a white light I also have a flashlight with Rubylith tape on the lens to provide red light. You can buy headlights for sportsmen that have a red lens. You should have one of those for everyone in your group plus a backup for ones that get destroyed or lost. In an EOTW scenario red light will be your best friend at night.

        Reply to this comment
  17. I wil survive September 11, 06:17

    For cheap lighting buy some those solar powered lights like the one’s you put out along side sidewalks and driveways. Put them out during the day and bring them in at night and get 3 or 4 hours of cheap, safe indoor lighting. I haven’t tried it but I bet those AA battery’s that are in them could be used in anything that takes AA battery’s.

    Reply to this comment
  18. JoEllen September 11, 16:14

    I keep them in window sills for power outages to help me orient to the dark surroundings. They don’t give a lot of light. (I even tried making a solar light bouquet in a wide vase I have and it still isn’t a lot of light but it can keep you from falling over furniture, etc.

    Reply to this comment
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