How to Keeps Eggs Fresh for Months with Mineral Oil

Sarah Davis
By Sarah Davis July 8, 2016 13:29

How to Keeps Eggs Fresh for Months with Mineral Oil

A lot of the Egg Substitutes out there are good for baking, but what about when you have the urge to stick them between your toes, or feel the need to egg someone’s house? The egg substitutes just aren’t the same. So if you want to make sure you are never without eggs, don’t worry, you can preserve eggs with mineral oil!

Preserve Eggs with Mineral Oil:

#1 You will need:

  • Eggs – You want clean eggs, and the fresher the better!
  • Mineral Oil – Usually found in the drugstore next to Pepto Bismal.
  • Gloves – You want to be careful not to get this stuff on you! (mineral oil can cause Estrogen issues in women so be extra cautious).

Preserving eggs1

#2 Oil Eggs

  • Warm 1/8 cup oil in the microwave for about 10 seconds. (this much will be able to do about 2 dozen eggs)
  • Dry eggs and carton.
  • Put your gloves on!
  • Rub a little oil in your hands and then grab an egg.
  • Coat entire egg with oil doesn’t matter how thick or thin.
  • Make sure not to leave any exposed areas, cover completely with the oil!

EGG3

#3 Place Egg in Dry Carton

  • Once the egg is all lathered in oil, make sure to place it in the egg carton small end down! Not sure why just do it!

Egg4

#4 Store

  • Short-Term Storage (up to 3 months): Store at regular temperature.
  • Long-Term Storage (about 6-9 months): Store them in a cool, dark area – Ideally between 65-68 degrees & 75% humidity
  • Extra-Long Storage (9-12 months): Store in Fridge

#5 Flip Weekly or Monthly!

  • Once a Week, Month, or whenever you remember, make sure to flip the entire egg carton gently upside down to help maintain the egg yolk.

egg5

 How do I know if the eggs go BAD?

  • freshUse your nose! You will pass out!
  • Play the Sink or Float game!
    • Sink = GOOD
    • Float = BAD

Benefits:

Besides the benefits I mentioned earlier, here are some other great reasons you should know how to preserve your own eggs:

  1. Emergencies – If you’re power goes out, you don’t have to worry about turning Vegan!
  2. Sales – When eggs go on sale you can score big!
  3. Space – Sometimes you just need some extra fridge space, and by kicking the eggs to the counter it will free some up!

References:

How to Make Powdered EggsH2O Dynamo Water 300

This Bug Will Kill Most of the Americans during the Next Crisis (Video)

13 Myths and Facts About Canned Foods

Survival Food – 59 Long-Term Survival Foods and Supplies at the Grocery Store

How to Preserve Eggs With Mineral Oil

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Sarah Davis
By Sarah Davis July 8, 2016 13:29
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16 Comments

  1. Gary July 9, 13:31

    Another way to keep eggs out of the fridge is to buy them from a local farmer and make sure they are unwashed. When eggs are laid they already have a coating on them that keeps out the oxygen, which is what makes them go bad, so they can go from store to your pantry without any hassel in between. If you go to England, or most of Europe, you will never find eggs in the dairy cooler because they don’t refridgerate them.

    Reply to this comment
  2. TomTom July 9, 18:13

    Mineral oil which causes harm – isn’t that affecting my health?

    Reply to this comment
    • Sandy July 10, 07:50

      Mineral oil is not the best choice. The estrogen / endocrine-disrupting issues affect males as well as females. You don’t want your sons growing up gender-confused, do you?

      The ancient Greeks stored their eggs in sealed jars of olive oil. A sunken Greek ship dated to circa 300BC was found a few years back. In it, they found unbroken, sealed jars of olive oil which were filled with eggs. The eggs, which had been sealed in olive oil sitting at the bottom of the Mediterranean for a couple of millennia, were still fresh enough to eat.

      So I recommend using only healthy, edible oils as the sealant for the eggs. I also recommend rinsing the eggs and spraying them with colloidal silver prior to coating them in oil. That way you eliminate any microbes which could have been harmful given the time to colonize the egg.

      While true that fresh, unwashed eggs have a coating which protects them from oxidation, this coating has its own natural expiration date. Anyone who’s raised chickens knows that, while eggs will sit outside for a few days and still be OK, they DO spoil eventually unless they’re collected and treated (rinsed/oiled).

      Reply to this comment
  3. Jeff July 9, 23:58

    Your Link’s are not working

    Reply to this comment
  4. Bobbytubesocks July 20, 16:13

    Very bad way to store eggs. Eggs have a coating called a bloom. Once laid can last 30 days UNrefrigerated. Trust me I found one of my chickens laid under my beehive for a month until I found them. I ate every egg, 25 in total.
    Couldn’t tell which was new which was old.

    Reply to this comment
    • crazywoman/Billie September 1, 20:21

      This is actually talking about store bought/commercial eggs. MOST commercial eggs have had the bloom removed, so this is replacing the bloom. Tho there are still many people who have their own chickens, and more starting to do it again, the majority of Americans do have to buy commercial eggs, which have been washed, and the bloom removed.

      Reply to this comment
  5. teaching english in vietnam July 20, 20:20

    Thank you, I’ve just been looking for information about this topic for a long time and yours is the greatest I’ve discovered so far.
    However, what about the bottom line? Are you positive concerning the supply?

    Reply to this comment
  6. the Deacon August 4, 00:55

    From 1974 to 1993 we were “back-to-the-landers” in the SE Alaskan bush raising our two children. We lived the first 11 years without electricity. After 3 years we gave up raising rabbits and chickens because they were so hard to get through the winter and they were magnets for bears in the summer (we canned up 9 bears in 3 years). As we purchased a years supply of food at a time we learned to water glass our eggs. Water glass is a common name for sodium silicate that we purchased in the drug store by the pint. It is a clear, odorless, oily liquid that we submerged the eggs in. We found 1 gallon glass jars would hold 37 eggs and take 1 pint to cover the eggs. We would take a case of eggs (30 doz.) and water glass 15 dozen in 5 gallon jars (180 eggs) and keep the rest in the cartons in our cold room. We would recycle the water glass. It worked for us. We used powdered eggs only for baking cookies and such.

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  7. GM August 4, 15:48

    I saw this on Doomsday Preppers a number of years back when the show was popular. I tried mineral oil on a couple of dozen store bought eggs. I stored them in the fridge and would rotate them once a month and date the carton each time to keep track. Between eight and nine months I had a party and made devil’d eggs out of them. They smelled fine and tasted good as well. No one could tell that these were stored for such a long period of time after I told everyone later that night. Will do it again if I need to.

    Reply to this comment
  8. BentonOLee August 5, 03:22

    Great blog here! Also your internet site loads up fast!
    What hosting company are you using? Can One
    get your affiliate connect to your host? If only my site loaded as
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    Reply to this comment
  9. James Elmer September 1, 19:58

    We had 100 or 200 chickens when we tried water glass. we stored them in stone crocks 30 gallon I think. We made up the waterglass/water solution and began putting in the eggs. When we needed more waterglass we added it, they kept well. If we had any floaters we took them out. They quit laying in the winter and after about 9-11 months we noticed they began to get watery inside. Were I to do it again I would try taking them out after a while and just sit in the cartons. I can’t tell you how long they would last that way, but I like the oil idea too. First I have heard about mineral oil being bad for you.?! No comment. Watery was the only thing I found unattractive about water glass from the drug store, started out with a gallon and still have some left. Coyotes and fox got the chickens and things changed – no chickens anymore.

    Reply to this comment
  10. clergylady January 23, 20:38

    My grandmother told about using water glass in her cool spring house to keep eggs through the harsh winters in SW Pennsylvania. They left the farm in 1920. It was an old family owned farm and she had been there since 1898 when they married. She always bragged she was the only one in her church to have fresh eggs to bake cake for a Christmas dinner at church. When I was little Mom rubbed our eggs with Vaseline to keep on the counter in a basket. I use olive oil or warmed coconut oil on mine these days. I don’t wash any but the dirtiest eggs, just oil and put in cartons to keep in the pantry. I had 2 dozen hens but dogs took that number down to about 8 hens but for two of us in warm weather we get more eggs than we use. I keep eggs Fall through Winter with this method. By spring I go back to fresh eggs and use up any older ones in baking. They would keep, it is just a matter of space. Spring through Fall I’m canning, drying and planning for winter. I always pickle some things I want to carry through the year. We love pickled beets, green beans, tiny tomatoes et for a relish tray or added to a salad. People are always surprised that tiny tomatoes and green beans are so good pickled. I even tried a middle eastern radish pickle made from long white radishes. They were good and a Jordanian man in the church always loved them on the relish tray with meals. I extend the freshness of raw cucumbers of all kinds by soaking them in a mild vinegar water. Not quite a pickle but still crisp and good for much longer than just being refrigerated. Many old fashioned ways, from before refrigerators were in every kitchen, still work well for us. Even in the days of an ice box many folks found good ways to preserve food and loose less to spoilage. Canning and dehydrating still are good. My mother loved what her family called Dutchmen’s Breaches. They were green beans lightly blanched, cut from tip almost to stem and hung on the clothes lines to dry in the hot summer sun. When boiled and lightly seasoned with a bit of salt they almost taste meaty and are good with any meal. They will keep for years closed tight in glass jars or hung in a cloth bag from shed rafters if you aren’t in a wet climate. I grow sprouts in glass jars or others in shallow trays to put on sandwiches and in salads. I grow grass sprouts to supplement winter feedings for my chickens, ducks and rabbits. They love something fresh as much as we do. Instead of buying crushed oyster shell for my chickens I dry and crush the egg shells and add that back into their feed a few days a week. These were the ways of my parents and grandparents and still help cut bills and work for me. I’m turning 70 in a few days and I know the grand kids think of me as ancient but these are wisdom older then my grandparents. Humans have survived and lived quite well for millenia. So can we. It does take work and learning but there was always time for art, crafts, feasts, and celebrations. Mindless boob tube time would have been scoffed at as wasted but I like watching the news and keeping in touch with friends by email and texts rather than letter writing. I love the composition but not the wait for answers. I enjoy reading these prepper sites but don’t learn too much. I plant cactus along fence lines, keep the place neat but not fancy on the outside. I still go shooting and clean my weapons now and then. I have packed bug out bags with a full surgical firstaid backpack, a survival pack and dried foods pack. I could grab and go but would prefere to shelter in place at this age. I do share all my learning and skills with my family and they all know where to find most things. I keep a loaded 38 revolver near by for dogs and I’ve used it. Even my husband only has a vague idea where it is. That’s because I use it killing dogs killing my chickens. Keep up the good work teaching and enjoying the journey.

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