A Small, Super Survival Shelter

C. Davis
By C. Davis October 2, 2015 16:10

A Small, Super Survival Shelter

I know for sure I would love to have a shelter like this. Actually it’s much more than a shelter. I mean I wouldn’t spent time building something like this just to spent one night in it, of course. But it would be a great place to bug out for a few weeks and live from what mother nature has to offer.

If you watch this video closely you’ll find out that “Survival Lilly” also incorporated in her shelter a hunting seat and a deer feeder a few yards away.

The shelter is not entirely camouflaged, but it’s not a bad idea to build hexagonal walls around the fire pit. It doesn’t says in the video but the walls will cover the light of your fire especially at night when smoke (from a small fire) is almost invisible from the distance.

My personal opinion is that this shelter can be easily turned into a small wooden cabin with a nice fireplace. What do you guys think about this shelter?

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C. Davis
By C. Davis October 2, 2015 16:10
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29 Comments

  1. CHING October 2, 16:58

    Nicely done.. thanks

    Reply to this comment
  2. cusby October 2, 18:54

    Awesome love it deffinatly gotta make something like this already made something similar but gonna take it down and redo it

    Reply to this comment
  3. flintlock October 2, 19:11

    Do you have any problems with drainage when it rains?

    Reply to this comment
    • C. Davis Author October 2, 20:29

      As I’ve mentioned, the shelter is not mine. It’s made by Survival Lilly.

      Reply to this comment
    • BK March 10, 16:43

      By the looks of it she has a tarp over the logs on her lean to, there is also a heat shield and a pull down plastic front wall. If it where to rain aand nd water found a way in I’m sure it would be reduced to drops,, however I didn’t see a water away drain in front of the shelter for over flow from a harden ground or a down pour. But, like all writers you need to come to this conclusion on my own, mate.

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  4. gerbal October 2, 19:18

    Excellent. Great design well thought out. Enjoyed the vide.

    Gerry

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  5. Charlie Brown October 2, 20:40

    Would definitley wouldnt be easy too add a full roof especially because it looks like that area gets alot of snow in the winter, commendable efforts thus far! If you were to turn it into a cabin, it would definitley be awesome! Although I think leaving it open adds to the experience possibly another covered area situated with a kitchen and more seating for prolonged stays.

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  6. kck2455 October 2, 23:20

    That is sssoooo cool!!!! You did a great job.

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  7. Mad Man October 3, 12:52

    Love it! Endless oppurtunities!

    Reply to this comment
  8. LarryD October 5, 23:35

    Lily,I have been following your series on You Tube and I especially like your completed bug out shelter.You have done a lot of hard work in making this series.

    If I could,I would like to make a recommendation of making a cover for your fire so that in inclement weather you can keep a nice warm fire going while not getting wet.I guarantee that you will appreciate this suggestion if it rains or snows.Keep these videos coming.

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  9. Anonymous October 6, 10:30

    That is a well thought out design. Just make sure the trees above do not provide any widowmaker (dead branches) that might fall on you during bad weather.

    The protective walls help keep movement hidden from the outside, but it also gives them cover for sneaking up on you as well. Perimeter alarms would be a good idea to construct. I would add some bug screening as well as that plastic cover. Harbor Freight sells that black mesh that acts like a shade but still allows air flow, very welcome during the hot times of the year. Also help prevent mosquitoes / no see ums from invading your sleep space. Yes, smoke helps your there too. I echo LarryDs comment about having the ability to move the fire in the shelter – be careful that carbon monoxide does not build up and asphixiate you.

    A couple of plastic underground barrel caches for extra storage – I think the young lady did a fine job of construction. Thank both of you for providing the information.

    Reply to this comment
  10. Shaman October 18, 19:33

    Should be fine even in a heavy downpour or snow as the SuperShelter set-up has been shown to work well in those conditions.

    Only change I would make at this time is simply more a matter of policy than construction. The old mountain men never hunted near their permanent shelter, but let the local wildlife feel safe and undesturbed. The reason is a simple one – if you got hurt or sick and really needed nearby food – the game animals would be near for you in your hard times. Always hunt AWAY from the shelter so that the game is there for you in case of emergencies……

    I do like the use of the chair as a way of looking and observing – much like the front porch area of a cabin or home. I just would not use it for hunting.

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  11. SWK February 8, 23:34

    Well done young lady – WELL DONE. Sehr Gut…

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  12. old ugly not very bright October 25, 18:20

    A cover for the fire, rain collection, some brush stacked against the outer walls for predator warning and to aid in camoflauge

    Reply to this comment
  13. clergylady November 3, 19:05

    great shelter idea. With a center pole and roof it would look a lot like the Navajo hogans that dot the desert country around here. oldest ones were half duggout and walled building. Practical except they needed better air to prevent being TB traps for the inhabitants. I like the stockade walls. Good hunting blind but needs more closure for our kind of cold snowy winter shelter. The enclosed sleeping area is practical and could be quite comfortable. Over all I like this a lot. I’d add an offset walk in opening with a “gate” to close it. Keep it on a visible part of your stockade. Here I’d face the opening south and shelter west, north, and east because of summer heat and storm winds.

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  14. clergylady November 3, 19:14

    A dirt berm around the outside of the stockade would help keep out water but a raised dirt floor could add to drainage inside. I’d choose a hillside if I had the choice so drainage would not become a problem with good planning . Flat land dwellings here were mesa top pit houses with a roof or adobe homes with built up dirt foundations and floors built above ground level.
    stockades were built around small shelters for keeping in domestic stock at night or in bad weather. When you live off the land those things become necessary considerations.

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  15. clergylady November 3, 19:28

    Many old Pueblo sites had planted thorny bushes and were often near lots of cacti. Plots of a certain kind of thorny bush often mark ancient ruins. I have a start of planting cacti that bear edible fruit on my fence lines. I Plan to eventually encircle about a 2 1/2 acre area. I cook pads and make syrup or jelly from the fruits of the prickly pear cactus. The thick moist flesh in the pads will thicken a rabbit casserole or roasted is great mixed with roasted peeled chopped chilis and seasoned with chopped cilantro and diced garlic. Salt to taste. I will eat from my inner fence….

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  16. Labienus October 28, 14:56

    I may have to build something similar. Good plan

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