How Our Forefathers Made Glue Out of Pine Resin

Arminius
By Arminius February 24, 2017 13:47

How Our Forefathers Made Glue Out of Pine Resin

Making glue out of pine resin is one of the cheapest and easiest ways to bind something together when you’re out in the wild. It’s strong, easy to carry, and durable.

Ingredients:

Before making your glue, you need to collect some resin. After that, you will need to find a container to heat the glue in, a fire to heat it on, and some charcoal, which you can collect straight from the fire.How to make glue out of pine resin-Ingredients

Step One: Melting the Resin

After the fire is lit and the wood is burning, take some charcoal from the fire (or get your charcoal ready that you’ve already collected), and let it cool. Put the resin into the container, and place it on the fire.How to make glue out of pine resin-Melt

Warning: Be careful while working with the resin as it can easily catch on fire from the gasses it releases while melting. Be ready with some pliers (or any other tool) to take it off the flames, and blow the fire out so it doesn’t burn.

Step Two  (Optional): Filtering Out the Resin

While collecting the resin, it’s possible that some of the wood will be chipped away with it. You don’t need this, and it just makes your glue chunkier. So to get a smooth liquid, you need to filter it out. Grab an extra container, and put some sort of filter over it in order to catch the wood, the pine needles, and anything else that might be inside the resin you’ve collected.

Filtering must be done quickly as the resin will harden fast and clog up the holes of the filter. Move the resin around in the filter to speed up the process.How to Make Candles out of Pine Resin - Filtering 2

Step Three: Crush the Charcoal, and Mix It with the Resin

After filtering the resin out, leave the clear liquid on the fire to stay warm. You need it to be fluid for it to mix.

Grab your charcoal that you left out to cool, and crush it into a powder.
Be careful while crushing it. Move with slow movements, and crush it carefully so the charcoal dust won’t fly out.
After crushing it, dump it over the resin. What I did was put two parts resin and one part charcoal, although it depends on how you like it. Experiment with it, and find the best for you.

Making it is pretty simple and easy, but you have to work quickly as the resin hardens fast and even faster with the crushed charcoal.

Now that you have your pine resin glue, you just need to test it out. I heated the glue up once again and dumped some onto the bottom of this large bowl, placing a wine bottle onto it for it to stick.How to make glue out of pine resin - Test
After that, I let it cool for around one minute. After lifting and turning the bowl over, the wine bottle was stuck to it completely.
How to make glue out of pine resin - Test 2
The glue works, and it’s strong, durable, it dries quickly and isn’t sticky or messy. It’s completely rock hard, which makes it easy to carry around. If you want, you can put it inside a small can or stick it to a piece of wood for easy access.

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Arminius
By Arminius February 24, 2017 13:47
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14 Comments

  1. Lucy February 24, 16:05

    All of this useful information about something so universal (at least in these parts!) opens up a window of comfort! Question: Once you’ve made the glue, do you have to just throw out what you haven’t used right away, or can the glue be heated over the fire again to soften?

    Reply to this comment
    • C. Davis February 24, 16:46

      No, no… that’s the best part… you can keep it or take it with you wherever you want… heat it and use it again… as many times as you want!

      Reply to this comment
  2. KE February 24, 16:09

    What is a good ratio for charcoal pieces to resin, or charcoal in measurement to resin amount?

    Reply to this comment
  3. Fred February 24, 17:34

    What is the purpose of the charcoal??

    Reply to this comment
  4. The Holistic Prepper February 24, 20:19

    Not only does this make great glue, but consider it like JBWeld. My father and I went white water rafting when I was 10 years of age in his aluminum flat bottom boat, which we punctured a sizeable hole in, while navigating through some rocks; he repaired it with pitch glue, and we let it sit over night as we camped on the river bank. Long story short it worked great and still is water proof, strong and in place to this day, and I’m now 55 years of age.

    Reply to this comment
    • Love the outdoors February 25, 11:59

      Wow that is cool your dad sounds like he is a fix it on the fly guy not makeing it sound like your dad is a quick fix guy and hope it holds that is not what i mean what I mean it that your dad did do a quick fix but he knew that was going to get you through your trip wish i had some one like that to teach me stuff like that but i not

      Reply to this comment
  5. dep of education February 26, 08:50

    Very good article. I absolutely love this website. Keep writing!

    Reply to this comment
  6. Samuel February 28, 21:10

    In 1964 we bought property with 15 old apple trees (est. 50 yrs old) never produced any fruit, just wood and leaves. I severly pruned them. Many large limbs removed could not grow the cambium layer across to seal the wood. I used Pine resin, Linseed oil & Stove Pipe black(a retired druggist got for me the pine resin & Stove pipe black). Melted the resin & added linseed oil to a semi-soft mix then added Stove pipe black. Painted the injury across the new cut wood and cambium layer. The stove pipe black captured the sun keeping the resin mixture soft and the cambium grew across 10″ width and healed the trees. these apple trees became very productive, apples averaged 15 ounces per apple, except Johnathan apple 12.8 ounces average. Your glue blackened with charcoal ground to a powder might work with linseed oil could do the same healing. Your thoughts.

    Reply to this comment
  7. flyfisher March 1, 02:24

    My grandson and I did this and made some homemade arrows for the willow bow that he made. We found some turkey feathers and used them. He was amazed we could do that without going to the hardware store. He learned a lot about doing it yourself and ended up we went out and he shot a rabbit with his homemade bow and arrow.

    Reply to this comment
  8. Love the outdoors March 4, 10:55

    Now this lady over here she is having problems with her fruit tree buy the time her fruit ripens it has fallen on the ground and is brused what can you suggest

    Reply to this comment
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