Top 30 Over-the-Counter Meds to Stockpile

Curtis Lee
By Curtis Lee February 2, 2017 12:15

Top 30 Over-the-Counter Meds to Stockpile

In an extreme and long-term survival situation, many items we take for granted today will be highly prized. If you made a list of items that most survivalists and preppers try to stockpile, near the top would be ammo, food and life-critical prescription drugs. Slightly lower on the list, but no less in demand, are over-the-counter medications.

#1. Activated charcoal tablets. They are usually used in an incredibly large number of situations, from absorbing intestinal gas to reducing cholesterol, but it’s very very important that you have this in your emergency kit as an emergency medicine in intoxications. It can trap toxins and stop their absorption in the organism.

Pain Relievers

#2: Acetylsalicylic acid (Also known as: Aspirin)

Aspirin can be used to treat pain, lower fever, reduce inflammation and reduce the chances of having a stroke or heart attack. Aspirin can also be used in conjunction with other over-the-counter medications to increase the other medication’s effectiveness. You can actually make natural aspirin at home. 

#3: Acetaminophen (Also known as: Tylenol)

Acetaminophen is used to relieve pain, including headaches and lower fever. It can also be used with other medications, such as decongestants and opioids (pain killers) to produce a synergistic effect. Research indicates acetaminophen is safe for pregnant women to take.

#4: Ibuprofen (Also known as: Motrin and Advil)

Ibuprofen is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, which means it’s great for treating pain caused by or related to inflammation. As a result, ibuprofen can be used to treat ailments such as high fever, arthritis and joint pains. Despite its benefits, pregnant women should not take ibuprofen, but there are other powerful natural anti-inflammatory and pain relief agents.

#5: Benzocaine (Also known as: Orajel)

Benzocaine is a topical pain reliever, often used for treating toothaches and sore throats. Benzocaine can be found in a gel, lozenge or spray form.

#6: Naproxen (Also known as: Aleve)

Naproxen is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, similar to ibuprofen and used to treat similar ailments, including headaches, inflammation, high fever and joint pain. One of the advantages of naproxen is that it lasts longer than acetaminophen and ibuprofen and is better at reducing inflammation than ibuprofen. However, naproxen isn’t as effective as acetaminophen or ibuprofen in some people.

Digestive Treatments and Relief

#7: Magnesium sulphate (Also known as: Epsom salt and magnesium sulfate)

Magnesium sulphate can be used internally as a laxative and externally as a wound cleaner. It can also help ease sore muscles.

#8: Alka-Seltzer 

Alka-Seltzer serves as an antacid as well as a pain reliever. Alka-Seltzer contains aspirin, which reduces pain, as well as citric acid and sodium bicarbonate, to create an antacid when mixed with water.

#9: Loperamide (Also known as: Imodium)

Loperamide is very important because it helps reduce the severity of diarrhea. Diarrhea is a serious threat to a person’s health in a survival situation, since it can quickly lead to dehydration. Here you can find 5 homemade remedies for diarrhea

#10: Bismuth sub-salicylate (Also known as: Pepto-Bismol)

Bismuth sub-salicylate is a great medication for treating a wide variety of gastrointestinal ailments, such as heartburn, diarrhea, nausea and indigestion.

#11: Calcium carbonate (Also known as: Tums)

Calcium carbonate serves as an antacid and is used to treat heartburn, acid reflux and indigestion. Calcium carbonate can also be used as a calcium supplement

#12: Ranitidine (Also known as: Zantac)

For those who suffer from chronic heartburn, ulcers or acid reflux disease, ranitidine is a much-needed medication. Ranitidine works by reducing the amount of stomach acid the body produces.

#13: Famotidine (Also known as: Pepcid)

Famotidine reduces the amount of stomach acid the body makes. This in turn helps reduce the discomfort from heartburn, ulcers and acid reflux disease.

#14: Cimetidine (Also known as: Tagamet)

Cimetidine is a stomach acid reducer used to treat heartburn, acid reflux disease and ulcers.

Related: This Common Household Item Is One Of The Most Useful Survival Assets

#15: Esomeprazole (Also known as: Nexium)

Esomeprazole is yet another stomach acid reducer and can be used to treat ulcers, heartburn and acid reflux disease.

#16: Bisacodyl (Also known as: Dulcolax and Durolax)

When a laxative is required, bisacodyl will be nice to have on hand. Bisacodyl is often taken in pill form and is used to treat constipation.

#17: Maalox (Also known as: Milk of magnesia)

Maalox serves as an antacid by helping neutralize stomach acid. Maalox’s primary ingredient is magnesium hydroxide, which is often included in other types of antacids. Maalox can be found in liquid, capsule and chewable tablet form.

Skin and Allergy

#18: Hydrocortisone cream (Also known as: Cortizone 10)

Hydrocortisone cream is used to relieve the itching, swelling, pain and soreness of skin conditions, such as rashes. The active ingredient is hydrocortisone, which is a topical corticosteroid. Hydrocortisone cream can be used to treat bug bites, eczema, poison ivy/oak exposure and other skin conditions.

 #19: Diphenhydramine (Also known as: Benadryl)

Diphenhydramine is an antihistamine that helps reduce the discomfort caused by allergies. Depending on the individual, it can also be used to treat motion sickness, nausea and trouble sleeping, since it causes drowsiness.

#20: Loratadine (Also known as: Claritin)

Loratadine is used to treat allergies, such as hives and hay fever. Since it is a second generation antihistamine, it has the advantage of not causing drowsiness – an important aspect of a medication during a survival situation.

#21: Fexofenadine (Also known as: Allegra)

Like Loratadine, Fexofenadine is a second generation antihistamine used to relive the symptoms of allergies without causing drowsiness.

#22: Cetirizine (Also known as: Zyrtec)

Cetirizine is an antihistamine commonly used to treat hay fever and other allergies. Because it’s a second generation antihistamine, the effects of drowsiness are much reduced.

Cough, Cold and Decongestant

#23: Cough suppressant (Also known as: Muxinex, Robitussin, NyQuil, Theraflue, Vicks and Dimetapp)

There are many cough suppressants available, many of which have other active ingredients, such as guaifenesin to provide additional cough, mucus and cold relief. The primary active ingredient in a cough suppressant is dextromethorphan. Here are some natural remedies for treating colds, sinusitis, migraines and much more.

Related: How I Make My Own Cough Mixture

#24: Pseudoephedrine (Also known as: Sudafed)

Pseudoephedrine is the primary active ingredient in strong decongestant medications. It is often used to treat symptoms of the common cold and sinus infections.

Medical/First Aid/Trauma

#25: Burn Jel (Also known as: Water Jel)

Burn Jel is used to treat burns, including sunburns. The active ingredient is lidocaine, which helps numb the skin and underlying tissue. Another way to treat burns and many other infections is homemade colloidal silver.

#26: Clotting sponge or bandage (Also known as: QuickClot)

QuickClot is a brand name for a bandages and sponges that stop bleeding as quickly as possible by applying a clotting agent to the wound. This is a great, unusual item you shave have in your first aid kit. Here are 10 more uncommon first aid items.

#27: Neosporin (Neosporin is an antibiotic cream that contains the following three antibiotics: bacitracin, polymyxin B and neomycin. Neosporin will help prevent an infection of a minor skin wound, such as a small cut or scrape.)

Miscellaneous

#28: Dimenhydrinate (Also known as: Dramamine)

Dimenhydrinate is used to relieve the symptoms of motion sickness, including nausea and dizziness.

#29: Clotrimazole (Also known as: Canesten and Lotrimin)

Clotrimazole is often sold in cream form as an antifungal medication. It is commonly used to treat jock itch, yeast infections, thrush and athlete’s foot.

#30: Multivitamins 

Multivitamins may not be considered by many as a medication, but in a survival situation, getting proper nutrients from food may not be possible. Therefore, individuals can supplement their diet with multivitamin pills to prevent malnutrition.

You may also like:

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How to Make the Most Powerful Natural Antibiotic

The Only 4 Antibiotics You’ll Need when SHTF

14 Powerful Natural Remedies For A Sinus Infection

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Curtis Lee
By Curtis Lee February 2, 2017 12:15
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21 Comments

  1. left coast chuck February 2, 17:34

    After using neosporin since it first came on the market, I have developed an allergy to it. My dermatologist recommended polysporin as an alternative. I am not allergic to polysporin. He told me that many people have an allergy to neosporin. I have probably used it for fifty years without a problem. He also said that sometimes after years of use one can develop an allergy to a product.
    A friend of mine who is a dentist said he had a patient whom he had treated for years with penicillin and suddenly the patient developed an allergy to penicillin.

    Reply to this comment
  2. Jecksbay February 2, 18:27

    Good, helpful article.

    Reply to this comment
  3. Elechim February 3, 00:58

    I do my best to stockpile things I will need in my home. Our electricity goes out about 3 times a year and since we have a well, so does our water. This is a nice list to go from. I have a mini-store in my basement and will be adding many of these items that I don’t have to it.

    Reply to this comment
  4. swilkins February 3, 02:17

    I don’t think I’d bother with the Cimetidine. There are plenty of other acid inhibitors, and of all of them, this would be the least useful due to it’s inter-reaction with many other medications. I would also add guaifenesin, as you need the expectorant properties. Alka-Seltzer is just a combo of some of the others, but consider adding vitamins of all kinds.

    Reply to this comment
  5. Lois February 3, 06:10

    If you have diabetis pack your meds. People in hurricane Katrina did not. Don’t ask me why they did not.

    Reply to this comment
  6. nene22 February 3, 12:54

    Every woman should have something to cure a urinary tract infection.

    Reply to this comment
  7. Jeanine February 3, 23:12

    How long past the expiration date can you safely use the medicines?

    Reply to this comment
    • Crystal February 4, 00:33

      Some up to seven yrs.There is an EXCELLENT BOOK written by stan deyos wife holly on http://www.standeyo.com , where you can get the dare to compare book, its 622 pages of invaluable info and almost a whole.chapter is dedicated to the real expiration of meds .most from 2 to five yrs as an.avg .check out their site, so much info it will blow your mind.sprry for typos on my phone guys, tell them in the comments crystal lane sent you 🙂

      Reply to this comment
  8. Crystal February 4, 00:29

    I am an RN and God has been pushing me to prep for two yrs and little by little I keep putting things away.It was nice to see someone who writes about prepping all the time thought of almost the same list as me.one more use for a tampon.I didnt see on your other article is it can be used to plug a gunshot wound pretty effectively .just an idea.and clear duct tape is priceless for everything from chesttubes to slings to making a tent lol.I love duct tape.also a pr of sharp scissors is a must and a couple small bottles of unopened saline which you can make , also hydrogen peroxide is excellent and a good kave a b complex for depression or people detoxing. Also magnesium supplememt is a natural miscle.relaxant .God blessfpr all you do.I started my site with just part ofa crazy testimony God downloaded into my spirit, and now im having problems.with the subscriber button Im.also going to have a community health page and an intercessor corner for anyone who needs prayer thats my goalby the end.of the month….wish I knew computers like wpund care .lol

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  9. JJ February 4, 17:04

    For heartburn, indigestion, better to store crystallized ginger–instant relief for me every time.

    Reply to this comment
  10. Coban February 11, 16:58

    There are a lot of old Indian cures I got stung by a nest of yellow jackets and my mom made a paste of egg yoke and salt and applied it to the sting areas it pulled out the stingers and for upset stomach with diarrhea she mixed up cornstarch and sugar with water and it would stop the problem within ten to fifteen minutes these are good things to know about

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